News

Photo highlights of the day: a naughty elephant and an airborne whale

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including a Thai water festival and kites on a French beach

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Categories: News

Field Test: Claire Bangser and the Olympus PEN-F hit the Mississippi Blues Trail

DP Review News - Mon, 11/04/2016 - 13:00

DPReview's Wenmei Hill and New Orleans-based photographer Claire Bangser recently hit the road with the Olympus PEN-F, visiting historic spots along the Mississippi Blues Trail. If you love the blues or want to learn more about the folks living in the small towns that dot the route, then you'll enjoy our latest field test. 

This is sponsored content, created with the support of Olympus. What does this mean?

Categories: News

The best photos from the 2016 Masters at Augusta

After four days of great action which culminated in Danny Willett’s victory, we take a look back at some of our favourite images from the first major of 2016

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Window on the world: Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock's Alaska – in pictures

The mercury’s dropped to minus 36 degrees and there’s a moose in your back garden, welcome to Alaska. Bonnie-Sue Hitchcock gives us an insight into the setting of her new novel, The Smell of Other People’s Houses

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One man's trash: the filtered flotsam of artist Stuart Haygarth – in pictures

Stuart Haygarth walked from Kent to Land’s End, picking up the trash he found on beaches – and arranged it into collections that show us how weird the ordinary objects in our lives can be

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Looking for Lenin: Ukraine banned the statues - but where did they go?

Photographer Niels Ackermann has been looking for the monuments hidden away under new decommunisation laws. The Calvert Journal follows the hunt

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The Dozen: the weekend's best Premier League photos

Our selection of eye-catching pictures from the weekend’s matches in England’s top flight

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‘Image may contain... cat?’ – now Facebook can talk you through your photos

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Sun, 10/04/2016 - 16:00

Blind users of the social network can have images described to them – although we shouldn’t stop captioning and tagging just yet

If you post a picture of a cat on Facebook, a bunch of people will immediately identify it as a cat – but now Facebook automatically knows it’s a cat, too. This could be seen as another invasion of our online privacy, but for the visually impaired it’s incredibly useful: with the help of Apple’s VoiceOver software, phones and tablets using the Facebook app can now tell you what might be in the picture. “Image may contain: cat,” the audio software says when I tap on the photo. Correct! So I try a dog. “Image may contain: grass, outdoor, nature,” it says. Ah. It missed a huge golden retriever. Still, nice try.

Related: Facebook has another hidden inbox you probably didn't realise was there

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Photo highlights of the day: Elvis in Scotland and Peruvian tuk-tuks

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including Elvis in Scotland and tuk-tuks in Peru

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Jammy dodger Martin Parr photographs food in all its grim glory

Amid the fashion for expensive, Instagramable meals, the photographer captures in his new book the more common cuisine enjoyed by a silent majority

Ah, real food. A loaded phrase, turned on its head by photographer Martin Parr’s collected shots of everyday cuisine. It is now accepted wisdom among the food set that the British diet has transformed beyond recognition. We’ve undergone a revolution! Food has always been an indicator of social identity, never more than for today’s flawlessly filtered Instagram generation. If you live on the internet, you’d think the whole country was milking its own goats, churning its own cashew butter and brunching on smashed avo toast in daily shards of sunshine.

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Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

DP Review News - Sun, 10/04/2016 - 13:00
Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Arctic fox, Iceland 2014. A young white morph Arctic Fox sunbathing in front of his den. After spending a week camping close to that place, the family just accepted me as one of them. Probably because of the smell! Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

Phil Garcia made a career of shooting mountain sports, but found his hobby photographing wildlife becoming more than a side project. Now he maintains a home in Iceland, studying and capturing the country's native Arctic Fox. Garcia is about to publish a book of his Arctic Fox photographs, and shares with us his views on photographing wildlife, respecting the natural world and what it takes to weather Iceland's rain.

You can see more of his work at his website, and reserve a copy of his forthcoming book by contributing to his crowdfunding campaign. Interested in having your work featured in an upcoming Readers' Showcase? Let us know! Include your DPR user name a link to your online portfolio.

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Common Vulture, Pyrénées mountains, Spain 2016. Vultures are quite common in my area and they are my winter favorite. I spend loads of time every year at the top of this cliff in the biting wind to catch this kind of shot. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

Tell us where you're from and your history with photography.

I'm a French photographer – I was born in the Pyrenees mountains, close to the Spanish border. It's a mountain area with lots of wildlife, such as eagles, vultures, capercaillie, foxes, mountain goats, deers, etc. I bought my first camera when I was 15, that was 30 years ago. Then I became a full time photographer in the sports business, specifically mountain sports such as skiing and mountain biking. I shot for big brands like Oakley and Redbull and also for many magazines, while shooting wildlife and nature photography as a hobby.

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Atlantic puffin, Iceland, 2015. Some years ago, I made my first trip to Iceland. That was the time before I went completely mad about that country and decided to buy a house there and spend lots of time photographing its nature. This puffin was shot in the midnight light on the westernmost point of Iceland, facing Greenland. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

What do you shoot with now?

I'm a Canon guy, and at the moment I shoot with the EOS 5D Mark III and 7D II. I don't use the 1D series anymore, mainly for weight reasons. Because I travel lots I like to take advantage of the APS-C format with smaller and lighter lenses. My lens kit include the 300mm F2.8, 70-200mm F2.8, 100mm macro, TS-E 90mm, 50mm and 16-35mm F4, all L-series.

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Eurasian Nuthatch, Pyrénées Mountains, France 2013. Snow is also one of my favorites subjects, but this picture was made from a comfortable shelter in my garden! Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

What kind of subjects do you specialize in photographing?

In my wildlife and nature photography, I like mountain mammals and birds of prey. But I shoot any kind of animal if it makes an aesthetic picture. I'm more after the good light and scene than after some particular or rare species. There are lots of animals I've never photographed properly but I don't really mind, I'm not ticking boxes. I prefer a good shot of a sparrow than 50 average shots of eagles.

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Arctic Fox, Iceland 2016. In winter, the arctic foxes of the white morph turn completely white. That’s a picture that took me a long time to get, as most of their areas are so remote that it’s quite impossible to get there in the middle of the winter, as the roads are often closed and the boats can’t sail. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

You're preparing a book featuring the Arctic Fox for publication. What draws you to this subject in particular?

I've spent a lot of time in Iceland over the last five years, as I bought a house there. Iceland is full of birds but there is only one proper mammal to photograph: the Arctic Fox. And it's a hard one, it took me two years to get my first proper shot of an Arctic Fox. I spent lots of time in the field, and I got to know Ester, an Icelandic biologist specialized in Arctic Foxes. With my wife, we participate in local studies for its protection, spending weeks taking notes in front of a den in the cold and rain. In the end, it has become a full time passion, even when I'm not in Iceland!

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Arctic fox, Iceland 2014. July is the time for the young foxes to learn many things from their parents. Although the animal is a canid, the cubs love to play in a very kitten-like way. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

Iceland is an important photographic subject to you as well. What is it that makes it such a unique destination for photographers?

Like in many Arctic countries, I think the light makes all the difference. It has amazing light and a very wild nature. I can spend a week in the field and hardly meet a couple of people. I photograph animals that may see a man twice a year. And many places are not hunted, meaning the animals are not extremely afraid of man, like in many other places in the world. 

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Arctic fox, Iceland 2014. After spending a week around them, the mother of this cub was so confident in me that she very often left me at her den with her cubs around while she went hunting guillemots for them. During that time, the male kept on checking the territory from a distance. He never got that friendly. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

What advice would you give a photographer visiting Iceland for the first time?

Any photographer I've met who has traveled to Iceland for the first time has one thing to say: 'When will I be able to go back there?!' It's amazing but it's a hard country too: it's cold at any time of the year, and you always need a good rain outfit. I mean a real rain outfit, not just Goretex, thick rubber like sailors wear! If you visit Iceland, you must also take a lot of care to not disturb the natural environment – don't break any plants, don't walk on moss. It took the moss three hundreds of years to grow some centimeters thick and can be ruined instantly.

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Stilt, Mediterranean area, France, 2015. I love to play with lights and water, especially when I use my floating hide. This stilt was playing with the light too. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

What's the experience of publishing a photo book been like so far?

It's been going pretty well so far as I decided to publish it myself, so I'm the boss of everything! It's a subject that is hard to sell for a publisher so I didn't even bother to propose it. It's really a lot of work to promote the book, but the crowdfunding went pretty well, it's almost done. Now comes the fun part of checking the files, the paper orders and the printing. I've done that already in a previous job, so it should be fine and the book will be beautiful!

Readers' Showcase: Phil Garcia

Arctic fox, Iceland 2014. This was certainly the first time that this blue-morph Arctic Fox met a man in a short distance. He was not scared at all, just very curious. Photo and caption by Phil Garcia

What advice would you give to new wildlife photographers?

That's an easy one, as I have guided workshops in Iceland for the last three years. I'll tell you what I tell my people: First, learn everything about the animal, from books or the internet. Second, learn about its habitat. Then you can open your camera bag and hopefully shoot something. Let the animal determine the distance, never follow it when it leaves and most importantly, as my friend Ester would say: 'Don't feed the foxes!' What that generally means is 'Don't interfere in the animal's life, just look at it.'

Categories: News

Merle Haggard: the maverick musician and his ‘defiantly contrarian journey’

The singer-songwriter, who died on 6 April, drew on his genuine outsider experience to forge a tougher sound in opposition to Nashville’s slickness

Legend has it that when Johnny Cash performed in San Quentin prison in 1958, Merle Haggard was in the audience, serving time for burglary and fleeing police custody. While Cash carefully nurtured his outlaw status, famously styling himself “the Man in Black”, the troubled, taciturn Haggard was the real deal: an outsider by temperament rather than design, someone who had found a kind of redemption in writing and singing songs about his experience of hard times.

In the photograph below, taken in a bar in Goodlettsville, Tennessee in 2006, Haggard, old and wise, stands alongside Hank Williams Jr, a younger singer in the maverick country tradition that Haggard had so defined on songs like Workin’ Man Blues, Branded Man and Sing Me Back Home. A complex lineage is suggested here: the younger man is the son of country’s music’s greatest icon, Hank Williams, while few would dispute that Haggard is the heir to Williams Sr’s tell-it-like-it-is songwriting style. It is a style that places a premium on authenticity – the lived experience – over self-mythology.

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Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of 'crease'

Wherever you are in the world, we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘crease.’ Share your best photos via GuardianWitness

We’re now running a regular weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review and the next theme is ‘crease.’ So whether it’s time spent in the middle of a cricket ground, a shirt that needs ironed or a well worn paperback, share your photos of what crease means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is Thursday 14 April at 10 am. We’ll publish our favourites in The New Review on Sunday 17 April and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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Dusk yourself down: readers' photos on the theme of evening

For last week’s photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of evening via GuardianWitness. Here’s a selection of our favourites

  • Share your photos on this week’s theme ‘crease’ by clicking the button below
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Categories: News

Art Drag: painted ladies get a new frame – in pictures

In his series Art Drag, artist Nigel Grimmer uses kitsch paintings from the 60s and 70s as masks. It will be at the James Freeman Gallery, London, until 29 April

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Get out your spudger: iFixit Panasonic FZ1000 disassembled

DP Review News - Sat, 09/04/2016 - 13:00
iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Feeling like taking apart your pricey Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000 enthusiast superzoom? Probably not. Thankfully, the good folks at iFixit have already done the work for you. So grab your spudger and #00 screwdriver and follow along!

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

The first rule of camera disassembly is... removing the battery! No need to take off the battery door at this time, as that whole compartment will be removed later in the process.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

After rotating the LCD outward and removing a few screws, it's time to get out that spudger and separate the display from the body.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

And here's the 3", 921k-dot LCD separated from its frame.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Now it's time to get out the #00 screwdriver and get down to business. The screws on the top and both sides must all come out.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

You can then pull the back panel off, after which you need to carefully remove a lot of ribbon cables.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

With ribbon cables and yet more screws removed, the motherboard can be pulled out. While we're not 100% certain, that large chip could be the Venus Engine processor.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Coming out next is the camera's 2.36 million-dot OLED electronic viewfinder. The unit is a lot bigger than you think!

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

After - you guessed it - more screws and ribbon cables, the lens can be liberated from the rest of the body. In case you're forgotten, this is a 25-400mm equivalent F2.8-4 'super zoom' lens.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

After removing the aperture motor and yet more screws and ribbon cables, the FZ1000's 20MP, 1"-type BSI CMOS sensor is now yours for the taking.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

Very gently, the top panel can be removed from the frame. iFixit warns users to be careful when doing this, so electrical wires aren't snapped.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

The disassembly is nearing its end, as this metal panel - probably used to dissipate heat - is taken off.

All images courtesy of iFixit.

iFixit Disassembles the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ1000

After removing with what seemed like a million screw removals, the FZ1000 has finally been completely disassembled. As you can imagine, putting it back together is as 'simple' as doing everything in reverse!

Thanks to iFixit for showing everyone how it's done!

Categories: News

Artist films daughter once a month for a minute over seven years – in pictures

Melanie Manchot’s images of her daughter Billie for 11/18, an installation that forms part of her solo exhibition, People Places Propositions

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Eyewitness: Uchuraccay, Peru

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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The 20 photographs of the week

The continuing refugee crisis in Europe, the ongoing violence in Syria, the Nuit debout protest movement – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Categories: News

A girl growing up on film

Artist Melanie Manchot filmed her daughter for one minute a month for seven years, starting when she was 11. The edited sequence is a fascinating record of a child becoming an adult. Plus, in pictures

For every parent, a child’s transition from primary to secondary school is poignant and bittersweet. You may be proud and excited, and your child might be more than ready – but there’s still a sense of time rushing away from you, of childhood running out, and not quite knowing what or who will emerge.

All this was true for artist Melanie Manchot when her daughter, Billie, her only child, approached 11. “It’s such a significant time in a child’s life,” she says. “Billie would have an hour journey to her secondary school, taking a bus and a train on her own, whereas until then, I’d taken her to her local primary each morning by the hand and met her at the gate at 3pm. I was hyper aware of the letting go, of Billie moving away from us and having a life outside the family. It’s a huge leap.”

There’s no narrative, no story. But, in a way, there is. It’s the story of growing up

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