News

Photokina 2016: Nikon stand report video

DP Review News - Wed, 21/09/2016 - 08:02

Nikon may have introduced the D5 and D500 many months ago in anticipation of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio, but that doesn't mean they're out of new releases for Photokina 2016. The ambitious KeyMission lineup shows that Nikon is taking the 360 and action camera market awfully seriously, while the D3400 should continue to offer entry-level DSLR users impressive image quality. Lastly, the Nikkor AF-S 105mm F1.4 is a gorgeous piece of glass that we can't wait to get out into the real world with.

Watch as DPReview's Barney Britton talks with Steve Heiner, Nikon's senior technical manager, about these new products (and even a new market segment) from Nikon.

Categories: News

A matter of life and death: Ying Ji's morbid surrealism – in pictures

Whether it’s her father or the victims of Isis, Chinese artist Ying Ji is fixated on death – and how to thrive in its shadow

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Adobe Lightroom CC 2015.7 and Lightroom 6.7 available now

DP Review News - Wed, 21/09/2016 - 05:04

Adobe has launched Lightroom CC 2015.7 and Lightroom 6.7, saying the new versions bring bug fixes including compatibility solutions for newly released macOS Sierra, as well as additional lens profile and Raw support. MacOS users are encouraged to update to the latest version of Lightroom before updating to version 10.12 Sierra.

In addition to the new camera support listed below, Lightroom CC now allows users to submit their photos to Adobe Stock Contributor via Adobe Stock Publish Service, more easily sync content between devices using drag-and-drop into ‘All Synced Photographs,’ and to always use Smart Previews in the Develop Module (regardless of whether the original files are available).

New camera support:

  • Apple iPad Pro 9.7″ (wifi and cellular)
  • Apple iPhone 6s Plus
  • Apple iPhone 6s
  • Apple iPhone 7
  • Apple iPhone 7 Plus
  • Apple iPhone SE
  • Canon EOS 5D Mark IV*
  • Casio EX-ZR4000 (EX-ZR5000)
  • GoPro HERO5 Black
  • Hasselblad H6D-100c
  • Nikon D3400
  • Panasonic DMC-G8 (DMC-G80, DMC-G81, DMC-G85)
  • Panasonic DMC-LX9 (DMC-LX10, DMC-LX15)

*Please note that we support the import and editing of jpegs, raw files and dual pixel raw files from this camera model. We do not support any specific dual pixel raw functionality. If you are planning to use Dual Pixel raw files, please read Limitations with Canon Dual Pixel raw files in Camera Raw and Lightroom.

**We added new versions of Adobe Standard color profiles for the Canon EOS 5DS and Canon EOS 5DS R cameras. These versions are denoted as V2, and the v2 profiles have lower contrast than the original Adobe Standard (v1) camera profiles.

The list of new camera lens profile support can be found at Adobe's Lightroom blog.

Categories: News

The Racetrack Playa in Death Valley National Park marred by vandals

DP Review News - Wed, 21/09/2016 - 00:15

Landscape photographer Kurt Lawson captured these images while on a photography trip to complete a special project about this area.

Check out his Website, Facebook, Flickr and 500px.  

It seems like only yesterday, a few weeks ago really, that we were writing about the vandalism at Cape Kiwanda on the Oregon coast. Yet here we are again with yet another case of vandalism – this time in Death Valley, California's Racetrack playa. The area is known for its 'moving stones' and it appears that vandals have driven onto the playa and caused irreparable damage to the landscape.

The Racetrack in Death Valley National Park is a protected area in which large stones seem to move of their own accord across the playa. In reality they move whenever it rains – as the rain water freezes and winds cause the rocks (sometimes boulders of up to 600lbs) to move across the playa floor leaving a meandering trail behind them. Evidence of this was actually captured for the first time back in 2014. There are only two places in the world where this occurs naturally.

As he documented on his blog, landscape photographer Kurt Lawson was in the area scouting shooting locations for a project when he discovered the damage. He entered the protected area in the park and began to notice car tracks. It appeared that a group of individuals had driven a car across the the playa, thus carving car tracks permanently into an area where rain is a rarity.

Deep tracks were carved across the rock trails that take years to form.

What this means is that these tracks will be there for a very, very long time – if not forever. Some of the tire tracks cross trails made by the rocks. There are three parking lots in the Racetrack area, so vandals would have likely ignored the signs and at each one of them in order to carve their own paths through the playa as they left the designated parking areas. 

What appear to be initials have been chiseled about 1/8" deep into the rock.

The type of damage that they caused isn't repairable. What's even more concerning is that whoever is responsible for it more than likely knew exactly what they were doing – there are 'No motor vehicles beyond this point' signs posted at every parking lot and along the roads between them. 

The area that was vandalized is well marked with these 'No motor vehicle' signs. You can see tire tracks off in the distance.  

After Cape Kiwanda, Yellowstone and now this – I'm really starting to question if what we're doing to protect these areas is enough. Only time will tell.

Categories: News

Hands-on with Nikon's latest kit at Photokina

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 20:25
AF-S Nikkor 105mm F1.4E ED

Nikon's stand at Photokina is split fairly equally between displays of its DSLRs and demonstrations of its new KeyMission 360, 170 and 80 cameras. We took a look at everything they had to offer, starting with the Nikkor 105mm F1.4E ED. It's as big as it is beautiful. At 106mm long and 95mm across, it's quite a handful. That said, it didn't feel disproportionate when mounted on a D5, despite its 985 g (2.17 lbs) weight.

AF-S Nikkor 105mm F1.4E ED

The 'E' in the lens' name means it offers an electromagnetic diaphragm. This not only operates faster than apertures operated by mechanical coupling, which is ideal when shooting at high frame rates, but also means many recent Nikon cameras can control the aperture even when they're in live view mode, which is great news for video shooters.

Nikon D3400

Also on show is Nikon's D3400, the company's latest entry-level DSLR. It looks a lot like the D3300 and shares many of its specifications, with it still being built around a 24MP APS-C sensor. Without AA filter, in this instance.

Nikon D3400

The big news with the D3400 is the inclusion of Bluetooth Low Energy, which it uses to stay constantly connected to a smartphone. The iOS version of the SnapBridge app is now available, to which the camera can upload images automatically. The camera also includes a significantly boosted battery life (1200 shots per charge), but some of this will stem from the use of a less powerful built-in flash.

KeyMission 360

Originally announced back at CES in January, the KeyMission 360 is about to become available. Nikon says the two >180 degree lenses that combine to give 360 degree coverage are one of the aspects of the company's expertise that it can bring to the sector.

KeyMission 360

From the top, it's apparent just how small the camera is. In part the lenses have to be mounted close to one another in order for them to provide an overlapping field of view.

KeyMission 170

A slightly more conventional action cam, the KeyMission 170 offers a wide-angle lens that provides the field of view that the name implies. Rather than needing a special housing, the camera is itself already waterproof and shockproof, though an additional accessory is available to allow the 170 to be submerged to much greater depths.

KeyMission 170

The KeyMission 170 includes a standard tripod thread but Nikon says it will offer an accessory to adapt this so the camera can be used with common mounts designed for GoPro cameras.

KeyMission 80

They KeyMission 80 is a wearable style camera with a (you guessed it) 80 degree field of view, and is designed to be used in a vertical orientation. On the front is a 12MP 1/2.3" CMOS sensor that's capable of 1080/30p video – no 4K here.

KeyMission 80

On the back there's a rear-facing 4.9MP selfie camera and a 1.75" touchscreen. The whole camera is waterproof to about 1m/3.2ft, shockproof to 1.8m/6 ft and freezeproof to 14 F/-10 degrees C.

Whither the DLs?

Despite looking high and low, we couldn't find any sign of the much-anticipated DL compacts. Prototypes are not yet available, we were told. We're still looking forward to them, though, and are hoping there'll be more news at Photo Plus Expo next month.

Categories: News

HumanEyes Technologies shows off Vuze VR 360 degree 3D camera

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 19:53

At HumanEyes Technologies' Photokina booth we had the chance to look at some of the first production models of the Vuze VR 3D 360 degree cam, first announced at the Cannes Festival in May. The camera uses 8 Full-HD cameras with wide-angle lenses that are arranged in pairs on the corners of the device to record 360 degree video in 3D. Of course you can also record standard 2D footage at a 4K output resolution and 30 frames per second. Each lens covers a 120 degree angle of view horizontally and 180 degree vertically.

A standard tripod mount allows for easy mounting to any camera support, including the combined tripod/grip that comes in the package. The camera is operated via a single button on the device and settings can be changed via the Vuze App on any smartphone. The app also allows for management of footage that has already been saved on the microSD card and for a preview of the final video. 

Stitching and editing of recorded footage is done in the Vuze Studio software on a PC or Mac and final results can be viewed on the included VR headset that is compatible with most smartphones. The Vuze will be available soon for $799.

Categories: News

SanDisk 1TB SDXC card prototype unveiled at Photokina

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 18:16

Western Digital has introduced the first ever 1TB SDXC card, doing so under its recently acquired SanDisk brand. Though the card will not be available on the market anytime soon, the prototype does serve to highlight the next level in SD card capacity. This isn't the first time SanDisk has unveiled a high-capacity prototype at Photokina; in 2014, the company unveiled its then-prototype for a 512GB SDXC card.

'Just a few short years ago the idea of a 1TB capacity point in an SD card seemed so futuristic – it’s amazing that we’re now at the point where it’s becoming a reality,” said Stargate Studios CEO Sam Nicholson. '…High-capacity cards allow us to capture more without interruption, streamlining our workflow, and eliminating the worry that we may miss a moment because we have to stop to swap out cards.'

Though Western Digital is showcasing the prototype at Photokina, it has not stated when it anticipates the card being available commercially, nor what consumers can expect to pay.

Via: SanDisk

Categories: News

Polaroid puts Snap Touch digital instant camera on display

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 16:21

Polaroid licensee C&A Marketing is showing an upgraded version of its original Polaroid Snap digital instant camera. The Polaroid Snap Touch adds a 3.5" LCD touchscreen on the back of the camera for easier framing and control of the menus and settings. Images are captured on a new and improved 13 MP CMOS sensor and the new model is capable of recording 1080p Full-HD video. Images and video footage are saved on a microSD card up to 128GB in size. 

Remote connectivity through Bluetooth to the Polaroid Print app for iOS or Android allows for printing from other devices, such as smartphones or tablets, and the app also offers editing functions including a range of filters and digital stickers. 

As before, at the heart of the camera there is an integrated printer that uses using ZINK Zero Ink Printing Technology, allowing for 2x3” prints in under a minute. Up to ten images can be queued, so that you can keep shooting while printing is still in progress. Selfie shooters will appreciate the self-timer and a pop-up selfie mirror for easy framing.  The Polaroid Snap Touch is available in several colors and can now be preordered for $179.99

Categories: News

Fotopro FS-X1 is a Xenon flash for the iPhone

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 16:14

Smartphone cameras can do many of the things that stand-alone compact cameras are capable of, but flash photography is not one of them. The tiny LED lights in smartphones do not offer nearly the output power of the Xenon flashes that are found in most conventional cameras. However, help is at hand in the form of Fotopro's new FS-X1 Xenon accessory flash for smartphones.

It offers a guide number of 5.6 (ISO 100) and covers approximately 53 degrees vertically and 66 degree horizontally. The flash communicates with the iPhone via a Bluetooth connection that has a range of up to 10m and a dedicated camera app. This means off-camera flash is an option as well.

A full battery allows for approximately 130 flash shots and Fotopro says the recycle time is between three and six seconds. Charging via a microUSB port takes approximately 1.5 hours. For easier focusing in very low light a focus LED is on board as well. Unfortunately, no pricing information is available yet. 

Categories: News

Rode VideoMic Me is a tiny directional mic for your smartphone

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 16:05

With 4K resolution and sophisticated electronic stabilization, modern high-end smartphones offer video quality that satisfies even demanding users. However, things don't look quite as good in the audio department and if you want your sound quality to match the images, an external microphone is indispensable. With the VideoMic Me Australian microphone maker Rode is now offering a new option for demanding smartphone film makers.

The VideoMic Me is a directional microphone that connects via the TTRS headphone/microphone jack and weighs only 34 grams. Thanks to a flexible mounting bracket it works with most smartphones and can be fitted for use with the main or front camera.

With some apps, a 3.5mm headphone jack on the rear of the microphone allows for play-through of audio while recording. It also means you can play back your footage or listen to music during a shooting break without having to remove the microphone.
 A furry windshield for shooting outdoors or in adverse weather is included in the package. The VideoMic Me is available now for $59.

Categories: News

Photokina 2016: Meet the new Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 15:53
Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

Alongside the announcement of the new E-M1 II at Photokina, Olympus introduced three new lenses. We got our hands on the latest zoom - the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4 IS Pro. Click through for a closer look.

Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4 IS Pro features optical image stabilization. This works with the OM-D and PEN-series cameras' in-body stabilization to offer greater compensation - especially at the longer end of its zoom. With the new E-M1 II's in-body stabilization system, Olympus is claiming a total of 6.5 EV of compensation.

Normally we'd be skeptical of such big numbers, but Olympus has been impressing us with its stabilization systems for years, and our initial impressions (albeit based on very limited, non-scientific use) suggest that the IS is highly capable. 

Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

As we've seen on several other Olympus lenses, the 12-100mm features a simple push-pull AF/MF toggle, for quickly switching between automatic and manual focus.

Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

The M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4 IS Pro covers an effective focal length range of 24-200mm, making it a highly versatile 'go everywhere' lens for travel, and videography. The constant maximum aperture of F4 will be appreciated by videographers, too. Olympus offers faster zooms, but none which cover such a wide range of focal lengths.

Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

At its 12mm focal length setting, the 12-100mm is relatively compact...

Photokina 2016: Meet the Olympus 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro

...but its overall length increases considerably when zoomed in all the way to 100mm.

Minimum focus distance at the 12mm end is a mere 1.5cm from the front element of the lens, and 27cm at the telephoto setting. The 12-100mm F4.0 IS Pro is fully weather-sealed as we'd expect from a lens in the 'PRO' lineup, and will be available in November for $1299.

Categories: News

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 15:16
Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Olympus used this year's Photokina tradeshow as a platform to announce the development of a new flagship camera - the OM-D E-M1 II. And we just got our hands on it. Click through this slideshow for a tour of the camera's key new features.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

The E-M1 II is very well-built. We expected nothing less from the successor to the original E-M1, and it's obvious that the new camera is made to withstand shooting in tough conditions.

As well as flagship build quality, the E-M1 II also features the now-traditional plethora of buttons, dials and switches that Olympus adds to all of its high-end cameras.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Resembling a small DSLR, the E-M1 features a high-resolution electronic viewfinder which offers a live view feed at a rate of 120fps. The reaction time is a mere 6 milliseconds. The low, mixed lighting of a Photokina meeting room was not ideal to really assess the quality of the finder in normal use, but it certainly seems sharp and clear.  

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

One of the paradoxes of high-end Micro-Four Thirds cameras has been their size. They're small compared to most DSLRs, but much bigger than you might expect from the size of their sensors. The E-M1 II is a pretty bulky camera compared to some of Olympus's lower-end M43 offerings, but it is more comfortable to hold, and that bulky handgrip feels great. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

New in the E-M1 II is a fully articulating rear LCD screen (the E-M1's screen was a simpler tilting design). Olympus tells us that this kind of articulation is more popular with videographers, which makes sense.

The E-M1 II offers a very impressive 4K video specification, boasting up to 236mbps data throughput. From our brief use, the revamped image stabilization system provides uncannily stable video footage, too. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

 Twin SD card slots allow for multiple configurations, including overflow (where one card simply acts as a spare) backup, and mixed-media recording. On shoots which involve both video and stills capture we suspect that a lot of photographers will record video to one card and stills to the other. The E-M1 II supports the latest UHS-II SD format.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

 If there is one word that sums up the E-M1 II it's 'speed'. The autofocus system has been completely redesigned, with 121 cross-type AF on-sensor phase detection points. One of the camera's two quad-core processors is dedicated to AF, which enables the E-M1 to shoot at up to 18fps at full-resolution, with continuous autofocus.

Our brief experience is extremely positive. Even in very poor lighting, the E-M1 II seems to achieve focus virtually instantaneously, and we're keen to try out the tracking performance once final samples start to ship. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

 The E-M1 II will be compatible with a new dedicated grip, which provides duplicated vertical controls and the option to add a second battery. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

 Duplicated front and rear dials make handling easy in the portrait format - especially with longer, heavier lenses. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Olympus OM-D E-M1 II

Olympus claims that the E-M1 II's new battery offers significantly greater endurance than the previous-generation in the original E-M1. It's hard to tell from this picture, but the new battery is certainly much larger physically. CIPA battery life figures have yet to be finalised. 

We're very excited by the OM-D E-M1 II and we can't wait to try out a shipping sample once they become available to press later this year. What do you think? Let us know in the comments.

Categories: News

Photokina 2016: Hands on with Sigma's latest lenses

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 14:53
Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art

Sigma is showing off its latest lenses, including the long-anticipated 85mm F1.4 addition to its Art range of high-quality optics. This means five Art F1.4 primes are now available in the 20 - 85mm range.

Sigma 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art

The 85mm is a very substantial lens, featuring 14 elements in 12 groups. No word has been given on weight, yet, but at 126mm long and with a diameter of 95mm, it makes quite an impression. The lens will initially be available for Canon, Nikon and Sigma mounts, with the Nikon version including electronic aperture control.

Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art

Sigma is also displaying its 12-24mm F4 Art wide-angle zoom for full-frame cameras. Sigma's early reputation was built on wide-angle zooms, so we're excited to see one wearing the 'Art' branding that has meant such good things, so far.

Sigma 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art

The 12-24mm will initially be available in Canon, Nikon and Sigma's own SA mount. The lens is 132mm long, with a diameter of 102mm. It weighs 1,150g (40.6oz) and has a minimum focus distance that ranges from 24 to 25.8 cm.

Sigma 500mm F4 Sport

As well as the two new Art lenses, Sigma has also added a 500mm F4 lens to its 'Sport' range.

Sigma 500mm F4 Sport

Weighing 3,310g and measuring 380mm long, it's a bit of a beast.

Sigma Cine Lenses

Alongside the traditional photographic lenses, SIgma has a range of its newly-launched Cine lenses. These feature gearing to allow the zoom, focus and aperture to be controlled when mounted in filming rigs.

Sigma Cine Lenses

The Cine lens range includes a geared version of the company's 18-35mm F1.8, now known as the 18-35mm T2. The lens covers the Super 35 format and requires a roughly 350 degree rotation to zoom from 18-35mm, allowing very precise control.

Categories: News

Best photographs of the day: a lizard caught and athletes return home

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including Paralympic gold medallist Kadeena Cox at Heathrow and a bird-singing contest

Continue reading...
Categories: News

My War: wartime photographs by US soldiers in Vietnam

An exhibition at the Highground Veterans Memorial Park in Wisconsin has brought together a collection of photographs by veterans who served in Vietnam. Unlike the images by the many photojournalists who documented the war, these were taken by serving soldiers and capture both the drama and the mundane moments in between. My War runs until 30 October, and will then travel nationally

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8 'Blue Ring' lenses

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 12:19
Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

Phase One is showing off two new 'Blue Ring' lenses at this year's Photokina tradeshow in Cologne, Germany. We visited the Phase One booth earlier and got our hands on them.

First up is the new 150mm LS F2.8 IF, which offers a focal length equivalent to 96mm on full-frame, making it a useful portrait prime. At first glance this is an enormous lens, but a lot of its apparent size is actually the detachable hood.

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

F2.8 is fast for a medium-format lens, which should ensure nice shallow depth of field when used wide-open for portraits. Here's a view straight down the front of the lens. See what we mean about that big hood?

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

With the hood removed, the 150mm becomes a good deal smaller. The new lens can synchronize with flash at shutter speeds of up to 1/1000sec and can focus as close as 100cm/3.2ft. It uses 8 elements in 7 groups and accepts 105mm screw-in filters. It could be yours for only $6990.

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

Next up is the 45mm LS F3.5, which Phase One tells us will offer extremely good edge-to-edge sharpness, even wide-open. Aimed at landscape photographers, the 45mm (and indeed the 150mm) offers a simple auto/manual focus clutch switch. Shifting to manual focus is as easy as pulling the focus ring towards the camera.

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

Like the 150mm, the 45mm features a leaf shutter inside the lens itself, and it can synchronize with flash at shutter speeds of up to 1/1600sec. Construction comprises 10 elements in 7 groups.

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

Equivalent to a 28mm field of view on full-frame, the new 45mm F3.5 has a closest focusing distance of 55cm/1.8ft. It is available now for $5990.

Hands-on with Phase One 45mm F3.5 and 150mm F2.8

This is Lau Norgaard, VP of R&D at Phase One. He's pretty pleased with his new lenses - what do you think? Let us know in the comments.

Categories: News

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 12:00
Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The new Lumix DMC-G85/G80 sits somewhere between the GX8 and the G7. It provides a much more advanced user experience and more rugged magnesium body than the G7 but without the 20MP resolution of the GX8. While the shape is very much like the G7 the build is significantly more solid and the grip feels more substantial. Panasonic has weather- and dust-proofed the body and introduced a new shutter unit that reduces shutter shock in mechanical mode and which offers an electronic first curtain mode for the first time.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The rear screen is the same 1040k-dot unit touch LCD that is used in the G7, and it features the same vari-angle hinge too. The viewfinder is also the same 2360k OLED but Panasonic has increased the magnification from 0.7x to 0.74x to make the view feel a bit bigger – which it does. The eye relief is also increased from 17.5mm to 20mm, to help glasses wearers. The layout of the back of the camera is much in the style of the G7, GX8 and the GH4, so will be familiar to those already using the Lumix system.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The top plate is pretty standard Lumix fare, with the dual control wheels on either side of the grip that can be customized for a range of preferences and activities. The head houses a built-in flash unit that can be used as an active or silent commander with the company’s wireless flash system.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The dial on the left of the top plate provides access to some of the drive functions of the camera. The high drive mode allows shooting at up to 9fps for 200 JPEGs or 40 Raw files, and the 4K symbol indicates where we find the 4K Photo modes. The new icon of a flower and a mountain is the Post Focus setting that now doubles as a focus stacking mode.

The camera shoots a 4K clip running the focus from the closest to the farthest point in the scene, and in Post Focus the user can choose which part of the scene they'd like to be in focus. The same clip can be used to create a focus stack of either all the clips or clips just covering a particular range within the scene – so you can have full control of what is in and out of focus. The mode is only good for static subjects though. An addition to all the 4K modes is Bulk Save – which simply saves all the frames from any 4K Photo/Post Focus clip as 8MP JPEG files on the memory card.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The base features the battery chamber with an additional cover that suggests that a mains power adapter will be available to run the camera from a household supply. The battery used to power the G85 is the same DMW-BLC12E 1200mAh unit that is used in the GX8. The contacts on show here are designed to connect with the optional battery grip DMW-BGG1.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The Lumix DMC-G85 uses a 16MP Live MOS sensor that operates without a low-pass filter in the same way that the GX85 does. Panasonic has included the new Dual IS 2 5-axis in-body image stabilization system in this camera and claims it compensates for 5-stops. The system in the GX85 only claims 4-stops. The new system can combine with in-lens Mega OIS when it is available to alter the principle source of stabilization between the body and the lens according to the type of shake it expects from the focal length in use. The camera’s 4K video features are much the same as the G7’s but now include unlimited recording outside the EU and 60p/30p recording in PAL areas.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

Weather-sealed covers on the side of the camera reveal a micro HDMI port along with USB, microphone and a cabled remote release socket. There is no headphone socket unfortunately, but now we can stream to an HDMI monitor while recording 4:2:2 to the memory card. On the other side of the camera you’ll find the SD card slot – which has moved from the battery compartment so that it can be accessed when the grip is attached.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The grip provides duplicates of the top plate dials for adjusting apertures and shutter speeds, designed to feel just like their counterparts as well as to perform the same tasks. Even the exposure compensation button has made the trip, while a back-button offers AF/AE lock.

Hands-on with the Panasonic Lumix G85

The optional grip DMW-BGG1 adds considerable bulk to the G85, making it much taller than the GH4, but it also makes the camera much more comfortable to hold in the upright position. It houses an extra battery that can be accessed automatically when the body battery is exhausted or when the user switches between the cells via the menu system.

Panasonic claims that a new economy mode allows the usual expected 320 shots per charge to be extended to up to 900 shots by reducing the amount of time displays are on. The economy mode shuts off the rear screen during shooting and works most effectively for those who use the viewfinder.

Read our Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85 First Impression Review

Categories: News

JK Imaging launches splash-proof Kodak Pixpro 4KVR360 action camera

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 11:42

JK Imaging, which holds a license to produce Kodak-branded cameras, has launced a new 4K 360 degree camera at Photokina in Cologne today. The camera is splash-proof and comes with a selfie-stick and remote control in the package. A status-display on the top of the housing allows you to view and control settings and parameters. Alternatively this can be done via a dedicated iOS or Android app on your smartphone.

Images and video are captured on two 20MP BSI CMOS sensors. The front lens covers a 155 degree angle of view, the one at the back captures a wider 235 degree angle. This way you can easily switch between standard 16:9 "flat" 4K video, just using the front camera, and full spherical 360 degree recording using both cameras. Both lenses have a F2.4 aperture and video is electronically stabilized. In still image mode the camera can produce 27MP spherical images. The PixPro supports on-camera stitching at a reduced resolution for quick sharing, full resolution files can be created on an external editor.

With Wi-Fi, NFC and Bluetooth the PixPro 4KVR360 is fully connected. It captures stereo sound using four built-in microphones but also offers a connector for an external microphone. The battery is removable and image material is saved on a microSD card. The camera is expected to be available in January 2017. Final pricing is not determined yet but should be around the $500 mark.

Categories: News

UPDATED - Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 11:36
Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The new Fujifilm GFX 50S might just be the star of this year's Photokina tradeshow. We're in Cologne and we just got our hands on a prototype of the new medium-format camera.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The first thing that strikes you when you pick up the GFX 50S for the first time is its weight - or rather it's lack of weight. Considering the size of its sensor, the GFX 50S is impressively small and light. Fujifilm used to make some highly portable medium-format film rangefinder cameras, and it's obvious that this philosophy has carried over into the new 50S.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Ergonomically, the 50S resembles an upscaled X-series camera. With the grip attached it operates in a very similar manner to the X-T2.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The rear LCD can be tilted for waist-level or high-angle compositions, which is very handy for landscape and studio work. The screen on this demonstration prototype has been grubbied by countless enthusiastic journalist's fingers, but trust us - once the smudges are wiped off, it's bright and clear.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

As you'd expect, the GFX 50S is considerably 'deeper' than the company's APS-C mirrorless cameras, but the flange-back distance has been kept impressively short, at 26.7mm. This view gives an idea of the size of the add-on viewfinder, which will ship in the box at no additional cost.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Although we didn't have a DSLR ready to compare sizes, the GFX 50S feels roughly equivalent in size and weight to a full-frame DSLR, despite having a sensor 1.7X larger. The body is weather-sealed and build quality is superb. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Unlike the X-T2, the 50S features a top-plate LCD screen, which displays key exposure settings. This view also shows off the traditional-style ISO and shutter speed dials, and Nikon-style integrated shutter button and on/off switch. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The viewfinder is lovely, and at least a match for the excellent finder in the X-T2 in terms of clarity and size. An additional finder will be available which can tilt upwards by 90 degrees and even swivel from side to side. This kind of articulation is especially useful when shooting in a studio.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

This shot illustrates the 50S's impressively short flange-back distance. A focal plane shutter allows for a minimum shutter duration of 1/4000sec.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The 50S is built around a 43.8 × 32.9mm 51.4MP sensor, without an AA filter. That's 1.7X bigger than full-frame. Despite the obvious similarities to the imaging chips used in the Pentax 645Z and other cameras, Fujifilm is insisting that this is a new, Fujifilm-developed sensor.

Interestingly, this is a conventional Bayer-pattern filter array, not X-Trans. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

The 50S will be available early next year alongside three weather-sealed lenses - a 63mm F2.8 Prime, a GF 32-64mm F4 LM WR wide to normal zoom and a GF 120mm F4 Macro. Three more lenses will follow later. Alongside the 63mm F2.8, we're told that the total cost will be 'well under' $10,000.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Here's the 50S paired with its optional grip. As you'd expect, this duplicates the camera's controls for vertical-format shooting and also adds somewhat to the overall size and weight. Like the camera, the grip will be fully weather-sealed. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Here's a view of the front of the grip, which features a Minolta/Sony-style mid-length shutter release. Although the camera is considerably bulkier with the grip attached, it's amazingly light considering the fact that it's built around such a large sensor. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

This shot shows exactly how impressive Fujifilm's feat of miniaturization is. The 50S is virtually the same depth and width as the D810, and actually slightly shorter, with its EVF attached. 

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Fujifilm GFX 50S

Here's another view, showing the relative sizes (and sensor sizes) of the 50S and the Nikon D810. What a difference having no mirror makes...

Categories: News

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

DP Review News - Tue, 20/09/2016 - 11:10
Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

The a99 Mark II looks a lot like its predecessor but a lot of changes have gone on. The most significant of these is the upgraded image sensor - it's now a 42MP BSI CMOS chip - but a series of tweaks have also been made to the camera's body.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

The heart of the camera's AF capability stems from its combination of a dedicated DSLR-style PDAF sensor with information from the on-sensor phase detection elements on its main imaging sensor.

In the a99 II, the dedicated PDAF sensor has 79 AF points, the central 15 of which are cross type. The central point is designed to be extra sensitive with wide-aperture lenses and is rated as working down to brightness levels as low as -4EV.

The remainder of the AF points on its dedicated sensor are horizontal type sensors, while all its 399 on-sensor AF detection points are vertical type sensors. When used in together, these provide what Sony calls 'Hybrid Cross Type' AF. These work over the region where both sensors overlap.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

The a99 II can shoot at up to 12 fps, something it can maintain for up to 60 JPEGs or 54 Raws. It can also continue to show live updates while shooting at up to 8 frames per second, giving an experience much closer to an optical viewfinder than usual, as demonstrated in the video below.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

The silent control dial on the front of the camera has been reworked. In addition to being able to rotate freely, for smooth control over continuous settings in video mode, it now gains a switch that introduces click stops. This means it can be used more precisely when controlling discrete, stepped settings.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

Sony has refreshed the camera's menus to make them both easier to navigate and to remember. Some associated features have now been clustered together - you can find all the movie options in the same place, for instance.

The tabs as the top of the menu are also now color coded, to help you recognise and remember which section of the menu you're in. Whether this is be visible enough to help you recall where a particular setting is remains to be seen but it's great to see Sony taking steps to address their menu system.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

The camera features the same multi-hinged LCD as its predecessor, and it continues to lack touch sensitivity. There's a flip out cradle that extends from the back of the camera and, at its lower edge, there's a hinge that allows the screen to rotate in several directions away from the body. This allows you to angle the screen in numerous different ways, to suit the way you're trying to shoot.

Photokina 2016: Hands-on with Sony a99 II

Numerous other refinements include never making you wait to get into playback mode. After a burst the camera can now start to show the first images you shot, along with an on-screen indication of how much longer you'll have to wait for the others to become available.

The a99 II also gains an anti-flicker mode for shooting under artificial light that syncs its continuous shooting to the brightest point in the light source's flicker cycle.

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