News

Cosina has discontinued the Zeiss SLR Classic series of lenses

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 20:58

Cosina Japan has officially discontinued the Zeiss SLR Classic lens series, specifically bringing an end to the: Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm F2.8, 18mm F3.5, 25mm F2, 28mm F2, and 35 F1.4, as well as the Zeiss APO‑Sonnar T* 135mm F2.

The notice simply reads (translated):

"[Production End Guide] The ZEISS SLR classic series of products (2.8/15, 3.5/18, 2/25, 2/28, 1.4/35, 2/135) has finished production."

The announcement comes a couple years after Cosina launched a new lens series called Milvus, which is designed for digital SLR cameras and more-or-less replaced the SLR Classic series. The Milvus series more than makes up for the lenses that are currently being discontinued, already boasting 11 lenses to its name, but there's no doubt that some true gems will be relegated to eBay auctions from this point forward.

You can still find some Zeiss SLR Classic glass new at online retailers for now, but don't expect that to last much longer.

Categories: News

A fully loaded iMac Pro will cost you $13,200

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 20:30
Photo: Apple

It's official! As we reported yesterday morning, the iMac Pro is now officially on sale in the United States, starting with the two base models—the 8-core and 10-core variations—and a price tag of $5,000 for the 'standard configuration.'

Up until now, that's the only price we knew for this behemoth of a computer—what Apple calls "the most powerful Mac ever"—but now that the iMac Pro website is official and the product is up in the store, we can find out how much a fully loaded version costs. And let's just say you should hold on to your wallets.

If you go to Apple's store website and trick out the computer, going all the way up to the 2.3GHz 18-core Intel Xeon W Processor with Turbo Boost up to 4.3GHz, 128GB of 2666MHz DDR4 ECC memory, a 4TB SSD, and a Radeon Pro Vega 64 graphics card with 16GB of its own HBM2 memory, your price tag goes up to.

Drum roll please...

$13,200

If you do one of the more basic configurations, you'll be able to get yours in the next 1-2 weeks. However, if you plan to shell out the aforementioned $13,200 for the fully-loaded 18-core beast, don't expect to get the computer in 2017. According to the Apple store website, a fully loaded variation will ship in 6-8 weeks.

To learn more or configure your own (if you're lucky enough to have pockets this deep) head over to the iMac Pro website.

Categories: News

Final Cut Pro X 10.4 adds HDR support, VR video editing, and (finally!) curves

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 19:08

Apple has released a Final Cut Pro X update that adds a slew of new features and expanded support to its video-editing software, most notable among those features being support for 360-degree and VR video. This is a major update for the software, which has been optimized to fully leverage the greater processing power of the new iMac Pro desktop systems.

In version 10.4, Final Cut Pro supports editing 360-degree videos and viewing them in real time using an HTC Vive VR headset. According to Apple, the software supports importing, editing, and delivering these VR videos, with available edits including "immersive effects," removing camera rigs, straightening the horizon, and adding standard videos/images to VR projects.

In addition to its new 360/VR capabilities, Final Cut Pro 10.4 adds support for high dynamic range (HDR) videos in Rec. 2020 HDR10 and Rec. 2020 Hybrid Log Gamma formats, as well as new advanced color grading tools, including color wheels with controls for adjusting brightness, saturation, and hue.

The latest version of Final Cut Pro also offers color curves with multiple control points, enabling users to make "ultra-fine color adjustments," according to Apple. Or, as our Senior Reviewer Richard Butler put it: "Curves! Curves! At long bloody last, Curves!"

Users have both manual white balance and eye dropper color sampling options, as well as the ability to apply custom lookup tables (LUTs) from Color Grading Central, PremiumBeat, and select other color grading apps. The latest version of Final Cut Pro combined with the new iMac Pro desktops also marks the first time a Mac can be used to edit full 8K-resolution videos.

Apple lists the following additional features as arriving in Final Cut Pro 10.4:

  • Easily import iMovie projects from iPhone and iPad into Final Cut Pro for advanced editing, audio work, motion graphics and color grading.
  • HEVC and HEIF support for importing and editing high efficiency video and photo formats from Apple devices.
  • Updated audio effects plug-ins from Logic Pro X with redesigned, resizable interfaces.
    Faster, higher quality optical flow analysis built on Metal, Apple’s advanced graphics technology.

The Final Cut Pro 10.4 update is available for free to existing Final Cut Pro owners, while new users will need to pay $300 USD for the application. Apple has also released Motion 5.4 and Compressor 4.4 for free to existing users, and at $50 USD each for new users.

To learn more or pick up a copy for yourself, head over to the Final Cut Pro website.

Press Release

Final Cut Pro X introduces 360-degree VR video editing

Apple’s Pro Video Editing App Also Adds Advanced Color Grading, HDR Support and More

Cupertino, California — Apple today announced a major update to its professional video editing app, Final Cut Pro X, with new features including 360-degree VR video editing, advanced color grading tools and support for High Dynamic Range (HDR) video.

Optimized to take full advantage of the incredible performance capabilities of the all-new iMac Pro, Final Cut Pro users can now edit full-resolution 8K video for the first time on a Mac. Apple is also extending 360-degree VR video support to Final Cut Pro companion apps, Motion and Compressor.

Today, with more than 2 million seats, Final Cut Pro X is the most popular version of the software ever and is used by professional video editors to create incredible works of art, from award-winning Hollywood feature films and commercials, to international broadcasts and the world’s most popular YouTube videos.

“With new features like 360-degree VR editing and motion graphics, advanced color grading and HDR support, Final Cut Pro gives video editors the tools to create stunning, next-generation content,” said Susan Prescott, Apple’s vice president of Apps Product Marketing. “When combined with the performance of Mac hardware, including the all-new iMac Pro, Final Cut Pro provides an incredibly powerful post-production studio to millions of video editors around the world.”

Final Cut Pro lets professional editors create VR content with the ability to import, edit and deliver 360-degree video and view the project in real time through a connected HTC VIVE headset with SteamVR. Users can easily add 360-degree titles in 2D or 3D; apply blurs, glows and other immersive effects; and use visual controls to straighten horizons or remove camera rigs from equirectangular videos. Standard photos and videos can also be added to VR projects and 360-degree video can be shared directly to popular websites including YouTube, Facebook and Vimeo.

The update also includes powerful tools for professional color grading. Unique color wheels feature built-in controls to adjust hue, saturation and brightness. Color curves allow for ultra-fine color adjustments with multiple control points to target specific color ranges, and eye droppers let users sample specific colors and apply manual white balance. Users can also apply custom lookup tables (LUTs) from popular color grading apps like DaVinci Resolve and websites including PremiumBeat, Color Grading Central and more.

With support for the most popular HDR formats, Final Cut Pro gains access to an expanded range of brightness levels to deliver incredibly realistic images. Editors can output video to HDR monitors using I/O devices from AJA and Blackmagic with brightness levels up to 10,000 nits. The new color grading tools support both HDR and Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) video, and with tone mapping, users can easily change HDR to SDR output for broadcast.

Additional Features in Final Cut Pro 10.4:

  • Easily import iMovie projects from iPhone and iPad into Final Cut Pro for advanced editing, audio work, motion graphics and color grading.
  • HEVC and HEIF support for importing and editing high efficiency video and photo formats from Apple devices.
  • Updated audio effects plug-ins from Logic Pro X with redesigned, resizable interfaces.
  • Faster, higher quality optical flow analysis built on Metal, Apple’s advanced graphics technology.

Motion 5.4 enables users to create immersive 360-degree VR titles and effects that can be instantly accessed in Final Cut Pro. The update also makes it easy to convert between any type of Motion project at any time, create realistic spring-loaded animations with the new Overshoot behavior and apply photographic-inspired looks with new filters. Compressor 4.4 lets users deliver 360-degree video with industry-standard spherical metadata. Compressor also lets users export HEVC and HDR video, while adding a range of new options for delivering MXF files.

Pricing and Availability

Final Cut Pro 10.4 is available as a free update today for existing users, and for $299.99(US) for new users on the Mac App Store. Motion 5.4 and Compressor 4.4 are also available as a free update today for existing users, and for $49.99 (US) each for new users on the Mac App Store. Education customers can purchase the Pro Apps Bundle for Education for $199.99 (US). For more information, please visit: apple.com/final-cut-pro.

Categories: News

The 2017 comedy wildlife photography awards

Out of 3,500 entries from across the world, this year’s funny winners include a laughing dormouse, a shocked seal, and bears caught in the act

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Categories: News

Famed Chinese rooftopper falls to his death from 62-story skyscraper

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 17:42
Photo: Weibo

Editor's Note: We have decided not to post the video of the tragedy, or even link to it. Please, if you value your life, do not engage in 'rooftopping' or other risky activities for the sake of a 'cool' photo. There are legal and safe ways to capture great photos from tall places.

Performing dangerous stunts to capture exciting photos has long been hotly debated, but that hasn't stopped some people from continuing to do incredibly dangerous things for the sake of a few Instagram likes. "Rooftopping," the act of climbing a very high structure to take images showing the distance to the ground, is one of the most popular of these activities, and it recently claimed the life of 26-year-old Chinese rooftopper Wu Yongning.

Yongning regularly engaged in risky photo shoots. Hanging off of tall buildings earned him more than 60,000 followers on Weibo and a portfolio of unique, if vertigo-inducing and deeply unsettling, images. In the end, it also claimed his life.

Photo: Weibo

According to Channel NewsAsia, Yongning fell from the 62-story Huayuan Hua Centre while filming an attempted stunt to win 100,000 CNY (about $15k USD / €13k EUR) from an unnamed sponsor. Yongning reportedly planned to use the money to fund his wedding and help pay his mother's medical bills.

A camera that had been set up to record the stunt captured Yongning's final moments, showing him performing a couple of pull-ups while hanging off the edge of the skyscraper. Tragically, Yongning didn't have the strength to pull himself back onto the rooftop afterward, and without anyone there to help him back up, he eventually lost his grip and fell.

The incidence happened on November 8th.

Recent public awareness of the tragedy has prompted Chinese state media to warn against performing unsafe social media stunts for money and/or attention.

Categories: News

Canon PowerShot G9 X Mark II Review

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 15:11

The PowerShot G9 X Mark II is an ultra-compact camera that features a larger-than-average 1"-type CMOS sensor. It serves as the entry-level model in Canon's Gx-X series, and has an MSRP of $529. Being the entry-level model, Canon has given the camera a touchscreen-based interface that will be familiar to smartphone owners who are looking to trade up to something better.

The main problems with the original G9 X were performance related. Continuous shooting was slow, especially when using Raw or continuous autofocus, the menus were sluggish and the battery didn't last for long.

The G9 X Mark II took care of most of the performance problems, due mostly to its new DIGIC 7 processor. The burst rate is faster, buffer larger and interface snappier. While improved, battery life still isn't great, though an 'Eco mode' gives you another 80 shots above the industry-standard CIPA estimate of 235. Canon also added in-camera Raw processing, Bluetooth capability and improved image stabilization for video shooting.

Key Features
  • 20.1MP 1"-type BSI CMOS sensor
  • DIGIC 7 processor
  • 28-84mm equivalent F2-4.9 lens
  • Built-in neutral density filter
  • 3" touchscreen LCD
  • Up to 8.2 fps burst shooting
  • 1080/60p video capture
  • In-camera Raw conversion
  • Wi-Fi with NFC and Bluetooth

The G9 X II'S 20MP sensor is found on all of Canon's 1"-type compacts, and is likely the same one found on Sony's RX100 III. The DIGIC 7 processor is what took care of the original G9 X's performance issues, and it makes a world of difference. As before, there's a built-in 3-stop ND filter, with on/off/auto settings. While essentially all cameras now have Wi-Fi, the Bluetooth feature is a nice extra, as it allows for very quick re-pairing between camera and smartphone.

Compared to...

The camera that is most similar to the G9 X Mark II is Sony's original RX100. It has an older sensor than the G9 X II, but it's closer in price than its successor, the RX100 II. We're throwing in the slightly more expensive Panasonic LX10, as well as the G9 X II's step-up model, the G7 X II, into the chart below.

Canon G9 X II Canon G9 X Sony RX100 Canon G7 X II Panasonic LX10 MSRP $529 $529 $449 $699 $699 Sensor 20MP BSI-CMOS 20MP CMOS 20MP BSI-CMOS Lens (equiv) 28-84mm 28-100mm 24-100mm 24-72mm Max aperture F2.0-4.9 F1.8-4.9 F1.8-2.8 F1.4-2.8 LCD 3" fixed 3" tilting Touchscreen Yes Yes No Yes Yes Burst rate

8.1 fps (AF-S)
5.3 fps (AF-C)

6 fps (AF-S)
4.3 fps (AF-C)

10 fps (AF-S)
2.5 fps (AF-C)

8 fps (AF-S)
5.4 fps (AF-C) 10 fps (AF-S)
6 fps (AF-C) Video 1080/60p UHD 4K/30p Wi-Fi Yes, with NFC+BT Yes, with NFC No Yes, with NFC Yes Battery life 235 shots 220 shots 330 shots 265 shots 260 shots Dimensions
(W x H x D) 98 x 58 x 31 mm 98 x 58 x 31 mm 102 x 58 x 36 mm 106 x 61 x 42 mm 106 x 60 x 42 mm Weight 206 g 209 g 240 g 319 g 310 g

Look at the spec comparisons, there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the G9 X Mark II and its predecessor. Same sensor, same lens, same display. That's because most of the changes are under the hood, which boost its burst rate, battery life (barely) and reduces overall sluggishness.

The G9 X II gets mixed results in terms of spec compared to its peers, though again, it's an entry-level model. On one hand, it's the smallest and lightest in the group, with a fast burst rate and Wi-Fi with all the trimmings. Its lens is the real weakness: it's slow (more on that below) and has a focal range that doesn't have a lot of reach. While better than on the original model, battery life on the G9 X II is poor, so bring along a spare battery if you're out for the day.

Lens comparison

Just like 'equivalent focal length' that we use throughout the site, equivalent apertures allow you to compare image quality potential across cameras with different sensor sizes by taking sensor size into account. The equivalent aperture figure gives a clear idea of how two lenses compare in terms of depth-of-field. It's also related to diffraction, which reduces sharpness as the aperture is stopped down. In other words, the higher the F-number, the softer the images will be.

Finally, equivalent aperture also gives an idea of low-light performance, since it also describes how much light is available across the sensor's area. However, differences in sensor performance mean this can only be used as a guide, rather than an absolute measure.

LensEquivalentApertures(["Equivalent focal length (mm)","Sony RX100","Sony RX100 III","Canon G7 X II","Panasonic LX10","Canon G9 X II"], [[24,null,"",4.90909090909091,"Sony RX100 III at 24mm: F4.9",4.90909090909091,"Canon G7 X II at 24mm: F4.9",3.8181818181818183,"Panasonic LX10 at 24mm: F3.8",null,""],[25,null,"",5.454545454545455,"Sony RX100 III at 25mm: F5.5",null,"",4.0909090909090917,"Panasonic LX10 at 25mm: F4.1",null,""],[26,null,"",6.0000000000000009,"Sony RX100 III at 26mm: F6.0",null,"",4.90909090909091,"Panasonic LX10 at 26mm: F4.9",null,""],[27,null,"",null,"",null,"",5.454545454545455,"Panasonic LX10 at 27mm: F5.5",null,""],[28,4.90909090909091,"Sony RX100 at 28mm: F4.9",6.8181818181818183,"Sony RX100 III at 28mm: F6.8",null,"",6.0000000000000009,"Panasonic LX10 at 28mm: F6.0",5.454545454545455,"Canon G9 X II at 28mm: F5.5"],[29,null,"",null,"",null,"",6.8181818181818183,"Panasonic LX10 at 29mm: F6.8",null,""],[31,null,"",null,"",null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Panasonic LX10 at 31mm: F7.6",6.8181818181818183,"Canon G9 X II at 31mm: F6.8"],[32,null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Sony RX100 III at 32mm: F7.6",6.0000000000000009,"Canon G7 X II at 32mm: F6.0",null,"",null,""],[33,null,"",null,"",null,"",null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Canon G9 X II at 33mm: F7.6"],[34,7.6363636363636367,"Sony RX100 at 34mm: F7.6",null,"",null,"",null,"",null,""],[37,null,"",null,"",null,"",null,"",8.7272727272727284,"Canon G9 X II at 37mm: F8.7"],[39,null,"",null,"",6.8181818181818183,"Canon G7 X II at 39mm: F6.8",null,"",9.5454545454545467,"Canon G9 X II at 39mm: F9.5"],[43,8.7272727272727284,"Sony RX100 at 43mm: F8.7",null,"",null,"",null,"",null,""],[46,null,"",null,"",null,"",null,"",10.90909090909091,"Canon G9 X II at 46mm: F10.9"],[53,9.5454545454545467,"Sony RX100 at 53mm: F9.5",null,"",null,"",null,"",12.272727272727273,"Canon G9 X II at 53mm: F12.3"],[54,null,"",null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Canon G7 X II at 54mm: F7.6",null,"",null,""],[65,null,"",null,"",null,"",null,"",13.363636363636365,"Canon G9 X II at 65mm: F13.4"],[66,10.90909090909091,"Sony RX100 at 66mm: F10.9",null,"",null,"",null,"",null,""],[70,null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Sony RX100 III at 70mm: F7.6",null,"",null,"",null,""],[72,null,"",null,"",null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Panasonic LX10 at 72mm: F7.6",null,""],[81,12.272727272727273,"Sony RX100 at 81mm: F12.3",null,"",null,"",null,"",null,""],[84,null,"",null,"",null,"",null,"",13.363636363636365,"Canon G9 X II at 84mm: F13.4"],[94,13.363636363636365,"Sony RX100 at 94mm: F13.4",null,"",null,"",null,"",null,""],[100,13.363636363636365,"Sony RX100 at 100mm: F13.4",null,"",7.6363636363636367,"Canon G7 X II at 100mm: F7.6",null,"",null,""]])

That pink line represents the G9 X II and, as you can see, it quickly ascends to the top of graph. Once you hit around 35mm, the equivalent aperture is ~F7.6 equivalent, which is getting into diffraction territory. At its worst the G9 X II is about a stop slower than the RX100, which most likely gives the latter a slight image quality advantage. The step-up model from the G9 X II, the G7 X II, is roughly 1.5 stops faster. This loss of low light capability and potential for control over depth-of-field is the price you pay to keep the camera so pocketable.

Categories: News

Trump administration reinstates mandatory drone registration

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 15:08

President Trump has signed a bill that reinstates mandatory drone registration in the US, reversing a court ruling from earlier this year that eliminated the requirement. Mandatory drone registration was first established in the U.S. in late 2015 by the FAA, but the requirement was reversed earlier this year by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit after it ruled that the FAA lacked authority over such devices.

The reinstatement was included in the National Defense Authorization Act; although whether or not Trump was aware of its inclusion when he signed the bill into law is unclear.

In a statement provided to TechCrunch, an FAA spokesperson praised the registration requirement, saying:

We welcome the reinstatement of registration rules for all small unmanned aircraft. Ownership identification helps promote safe and responsible drone operation and is a key component to full integration.

Operators in the U.S. must register their drone if it weighs between 0.55lbs and 55lbs. The FAA's registration website currently states, "You will be subject to civil and criminal penalties if you meet the criteria to register an unmanned aircraft and do not register." Drones weighing more than 55lbs must be registered by paper rather than online.

The agency provides full aircraft registry details here.

Categories: News

iPhone X sample gallery

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 14:00
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The iPhone X shares the iPhone 8 Plus' camera specs with two notable exceptions: both of the X's main cameras are stabilized, and the telephoto lens boasts a brighter F2.4 aperture. Additionally, the X's front-facing 'TrueDepth' camera makes it possible to take selfies using Portrait Mode. Take a look at what Apple's newest flagship device can do.

See our iPhone X sample gallery

Categories: News

Kind of blue: Porto's azulejo facades – in pictures

In our weekly look at travel through three Instagram shots, Sam Jemai gets fired up by Porto’s famous blue tiles

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Categories: News

Grenfell Tower national memorial service – in pictures

Survivors, bereaved families, the local community and first responders were joined by politicians and members of the royal family at St Paul’s Cathedral for a service to honour those who died in the Grenfell Tower fire

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Categories: News

Have your say: Best zoom lens of 2017

DP Review News - Thu, 14/12/2017 - 12:00

This year saw plenty of new lenses released, including several excellent zooms. We've used a lot of them, but we want to hear from you – what were your favorite zoom lenses of 2017?

Categories: News

Monkeys and a Nutcracker: Thursday's top photos

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world

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Categories: News

Photographer of the year: we shortlist the best of 2017

Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, bombed-out buildings in Syria and an anti-Trump march in New York are among the images captured by the agency photographers shortlisted by the Guardian picture desk this year. The winner will be announced on 21 December

From photojournalism in conflict zones and refugee camps to reactive news, politics, and feature work, the shortlist for agency photographer of the year 2017 scratches only the surface of the breathtaking work seen by the Guardian’s picture desk over the past 12 months.

More than 10,000 images come into the picture system from agencies on a daily basis. In addition to the daily run of galleries, the weekly From the Agencies series is where we display photo stories by individual news photographers. The winner of the agency photographer of the year 2017 competition will be revealed on 21 December.

The assignments that excite me the most are humanitarian pieces and stories related to people’s struggle for their citizenship and human rights against those who want to dominate them

This woman appeared but she was exhausted … which was when we reached out to help

No matter how small or big, any assignment can be made interesting

You never know when a simple assignment will turn into a much larger story down the road

I got to spend 10 entire days on the border project … The time allowed us to show how things truly are on the ground.

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Categories: News

Minor White's vanished America – in pictures

In 1937, this son of a book-keeper and dressmaker moved from Minnesota to Portland, where he chronicled soon-to-be demolished 19th-century buildings – developing a vision that would influence countless photographers to come

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Categories: News

Ethiopia's living churches – in pictures

As one of the first countries to adopt Christianity, Ethiopia has a legacy of churches and monasteries, built on hilltops or hewn out of cliff faces, as well as vibrant traditions of worship. These are celebrated in a lavish book, Ethiopia: The Living Churches of an Ancient Kingdom

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Categories: News

These are the winners of Nat Geo's Nature Photographer of the Year 2017

DP Review News - Wed, 13/12/2017 - 21:52
2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

National Geographic has revealed the winners of their annual Nature Photographer of the Year contest, and as usual, every photo from the Grand Prize winner all the way to the Honorable Mentions and People's Choice awards are fantastic.

The Grand Prize this year—and title of Nature Photographer of the Year—went to Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore, who captured an intense wildlife portrait of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park. The photo, titled "Face to Face in a River in Borneo," was selected from over 11,000 entries and earns Bojan $10,000 in prize money, in addition to his image showing up in an upcoming issue of National Geographic.

Speaking of the moment he captured the shot, Bojan told Nat Geo:

Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.

You can see Bojan's grand prize winning image, as well as every 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and People's Choice winner in the slideshow above, or by visiting the National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year website.

Press Release

National Geographic Announces Winners of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Contest

WASHINGTON (Dec. 12, 2017) – Selected from over 11,000 entries, a wildlife photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park has been selected as the grand-prize winner of the 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The photo, titled “Face to face in a river in Borneo,” was captured by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore. He has won $10,000 and will have his winning image published in an upcoming issue of National Geographic magazine and featured on the @NatGeo Instagram account.

Bojan took the winning photo after waiting patiently in the Sekoyner River in Tanjung Puting National Park in Borneo, Indonesia. After spending several days on a houseboat photographing orangutans in the park, Bojan learned of a location where a male orangutan had crossed the river –­ unusual behavior that he knew he had to capture. After waiting a day and night near the suspected location, a ranger spotted the orangutan the next morning at a spot a few minutes up the river. As they drew near, Bojan decided to get into the water so the boat did not scare the primate. About five feet deep in a river supposedly home to freshwater crocodiles, Bojan captured the photo when the orangutan peeked out from behind a tree to see if the photographer was still there.

On capturing the photo, Bojan said, “Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.”

Karim Iliya of Haiku, Hawaii, won first place in the Landscapes category for a photo from Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park; Jim Obester of Vancouver, Wash., won first place in the Underwater category for a photo of an anemone; and Todd Kennedy of New South Wales, Australia, won first place in the Aerials category for a photo of a rock pool in Sydney at high tide.

The judges for the contest were National Geographic magazine’s senior photo editor of natural history assignments, Kathy Moran, National Geographic photographer Anand Varma, and photographer Michaela Skovranova.

Contestants submitted photographs in four categories – Wildlife, Landscape, Aerials and Underwater – through National Geographic’s photography community, Your Shot. All of the winning photos, along with the honorable mentions, may be viewed at natgeo.com/photocontest.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Wildlife and Grand Prize Winner

Photo © Jayprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A male orangutan peers from behind a tree while crossing a river in Borneo, Indonesia.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Underwater

Photo © Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Jim Obester, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of a tube-dwelling anemone in Hood Canal, Washington.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Landscapes

Photo © Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Karim Iliya, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Shortly before twilight in Kalapana, Hawai’i, a fragment of the cooled lava tube broke away, leaving the molten rock to fan in a fiery spray for less than half an hour before returning to a steady flow.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

1st Place | Aerials

Photo © Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Todd Kennedy, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Alejandro Prieto, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

An adult Caribbean pink flamingo feeds a chick in Yucatán, Mexico. Both parents alternate feeding chicks, at first with a liquid baby food called crop milk, and then with regurgitated food.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Underwater

Photo © Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Shane Gross, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Typically a shy species, a Caribbean reef shark investigates a remote-triggered camera in Cuba’s Gardens of the Queen marine protected area.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Yuhan Liao, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunlight glances off mineral strata of different colors in Dushanzi Grand Canyon, China.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

2nd Place | Aerials

Photo © Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Takahiro Bessho, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Snow-covered metasequoia trees, also called dawn redwoods, interlace over a road in Takashima, Japan.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Wildlife

Photo © Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Bence Mate, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Two grey herons spar as a white-tailed eagle looks on in Hungary.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Underwater

Photo © Michael Patrick O'Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Michael Patrick O'Neill, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Buoyed by the Gulf Stream, a flying fish arcs through the night-dark water five miles off Palm Beach, Florida.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Landscapes

Photo © Mike Olbinski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Mike Olbinski Photography, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A summer thunderstorm unleashes lightning on the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

3rd Place | Aerials

Photo © Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Greg C., 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

On the flanks of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai’i, the world’s only lava ocean entry spills molten rock into the Pacific Ocean. After erupting in early 2016, the lava flow took about two months to reach the sea, six miles away.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People's Choice | Wildlife

Photo © Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Harry Collins, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A great gray owl swoops to kill in a New Hampshire field.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People's Choice | Underwater

Photo © Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Matthew Smith, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

A Portuguese man-of-war nears the beach on a summer morning; thousands of these jellyfish wash up on Australia’s eastern coast every year.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People's Choice | Landscapes

Photo © Wojciech Kruczynski, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by Wojciech Kruczyński, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Sunset illuminates a lighthouse and rainbow in the Faroe Islands.

2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year Winners

People's Choice | Aerials

Photo © David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year.

Photograph by David Swindler, 2017 National Geographic Nature Photographer of the Year

Green vegetation blooms at the river’s edge, or riparian, zone of a meandering canyon in Utah.

Categories: News

High Sight launches the Mini portable cable camera system

DP Review News - Wed, 13/12/2017 - 20:10

Manufacturer of cable camera systems High Sight has unveiled the latest addition to its product lineup. The Mini System was designed with portability and ease of use in mind, but builds on High Sight's experience building larger and more complex products. The unit is controlled via a button interface and can carry gimbals, such as the DJI Osmo, Gopro Karma Grip and similar models.

“The High Sight Mini has been a blast to create and will be a game changer.” said Kevin Brower, president and chief executive officer of High Sight. “The Mini has evolved into something more than we could’ve hoped for. With our ping pong mode, you can set it up and walk away, it’s like having an extra cameraman on set just continually getting great footage.”

The Mini uses speed and position sensing for smooth movement and has been developed to be be fully autonomous. According to High Sight, this means the operator can focus on camera control, allowing for single user operation when normally two users would be required.

The Mini is made from machined aluminum and weighs only 1.3 lbs (0.6 kg). It can carry a payload of 3.3 lbs (1.5 kg) and easily fits into a backpack.

The demo reel below will give you a better idea of the kind of shots that are possible with the company's cable systems. And if you think the Mini could be a useful tool for shooting your next video, you can find more information on the High Sight website.

Press Release:

High Sight Mini Sets The Bar With Ultra-Portable Design And Smart Functionality

Features Fully Autonomous Mode, Whisper Quiet Movement, and Reliable Performance. High Sight Launches New Product Allowing One of a Kind Shot.

Salt Lake City, Utah, November 7th, 2017 High Sight (highsightcam.com) cable camera systems is proud to launch the ultra-portable and fully autonomous Mini system. The new system was developed through years of experience building larger and more complex products. The Mini was brought about when creator and owner of High Sight saw a need for a smaller version in their current product line.

“The High Sight Mini has been a blast to create and will be a game changer.” said Kevin Brower, president and chief executive officer of High Sight. “The Mini has evolved into something more than we could’ve hoped for. With our ping pong mode, you can set it up and walk away, it’s like having an extra cameraman on set just continually getting great footage.”

Innovative: The Mini was designed to be compact, easy to use, and intelligent. Through years of experience High Sight developed the mini to be fully autonomous. By eliminating the task of controlling the Mini the operator can focus live camera control. This functionality allows for a single user to capture the same shot that would normally require two users. The Mini is great at capturing new and creative angles. Use it to shoot
interesting b-roll or set it on ping pong mode and capture great moments in your next BTS video.

  • Intelligent speed and position sensing for perfectly smooth movement
  • Fully Autonomous mode
  • Button interface for quick and easy operation
  • Compact size allows for maximum portability
  • ¼-20 mount to carry gimbals like the DJI Osmo, Gopro Karma Grip and many more
  • Machined aluminum for increased durability and protection
  • Made in the USA

Specs and Details:

  • Weight: 1.3 lbs. / .6 kg
  • Dimensions: 7.48” Long : 3.2" Wide : 2.3" Tall
  • Max Payload: 3.3 lbs. / 1.5 kg
  • Max Speed: 10 mph
  • Battery: Rechargeable: Lithium ion battery
Categories: News

The Dutch police have shut down their drone-catching eagle program

DP Review News - Wed, 13/12/2017 - 19:56

Dutch police are retiring their drone-catching eagles due to a combination of performance issues and a lack of need, according to a report from NOS. The eagles were originally deployed as a way to intercept wayward (and potentially dangerous) drones, but training the eagles is reportedly too costly, and the need for them is too low.

Various solutions have been developed to deal with the issue of drones flying where they're not allowed, but the eagles were probably the most interesting, and definitely the coolest to watch in action. In fact, you can see a demonstration of one of these trained eagles in the video below:

Other drone-control solutions involve police drones that launch nets to capture the unwelcome drones, and jamming devices that disrupt a drone's ability to communicate with its remote control, causing the device to return home. The Netherlands, however, chose to experiment with eagles instead.

Unfortunately, despite intense training, the eagles didn't always act as intended, reports NOS, citing a statement from a police spokesperson. Given these training troubles, officials worries that the eagles might not perform as expected when used outside of their training environment.

Between this possibility and a (surprising?) lack of demand for drone-catching eagles, the program is now officially shut down.

Categories: News

When photographers become pitchmen

DP Review News - Wed, 13/12/2017 - 19:07

This article was originally published on the PhotoShelter blog, and is being republished in full on DPReview with express permission.

It’s not surprising when camera companies hire photographers to pitch their products. But photographers have also been enlisted to sell other types of products; the result of Madison Avenue trying to romanticize the occupation, even though the reality often fails to meet the expectation. Nowadays photographers are more likely to spend the majority of their time sitting at a desk in post processing, or trying to collect on invoices that are 6 months past due.

Nevertheless, we’ve seen a number of companies in a variety of industries employ photographers in their ad campaigns in the past few years, spaning the gamut from the old living icons to the newest generation of light chasers.

Elliott Erwitt for Cole Haan

As a part of their “Born in 1928” campaign launched in 2013, shoe brand Cole Haan teamed up with the legendary Elliott Erwitt to celebrate the “off” year 85th anniversary of the brand. The cherubic-faced Erwitt looks smartly dressed in a pair of Cole Haan kicks, while draping his camera over his shoulder. Photographer Daniel Jackson shot the campaign.

Lynsey Addario for Audi

Decorated war photographer Lynsey Addario’s decision to appear in a 2014 Audi ad wasn’t without controversy, given the glamorization of the job vis-à-vis the death of her driver at the hands of her captors.

On the other hand, the choice to use a female war photographer undoubtedly had an impact on the public’s understanding and definition of war photographer—showing that both men and women put their lives on the line to cover the atrocities of war.

Steve McCurry and David Alan Harvey for Filson

In 2014, Filson, the longtime purveyor of outdoor clothing and bags, teamed up with Magnum Photographers Steve McCurry and David Alan Harvey to design a set of camera bags that Harvey described as, “something I could use in the Favelas in Rio, but still take to a dinner party.”

Although the bags had a limited run, Filson cleared banked on the mythology of two of the industry’s heavyweights.

Pei Ketron and Paul Nicklen for American Express

Photographer and educator Pei Ketron burst to prominence as one of the early “recommended” photographers to follow on Instagram, helping to make her one of the first photographers to gain half a million followers.

Biologist/photographer Paul Nicken’s incredible undersea images and prominence in the National Geographic’s Instagram feed has helped to propel him to over 3.8 million followers and growing.

The significant social media reach likely influenced American Express’ decision to tap both photographers in early 2016 for a series of travel-based ads touting the benefits of the AMEX Gold Card ("double and triple points, plus no foreign transaction fee!")

Barbara Davidson for Volvo

Former Los Angeles Times photojournalist and Pulitzer Prize-winner Barbara Davidson was tapped by Volvo in 2017 to show off their XC60 urban camera safety system. Volvo’s unorthodox approach used Davidson’s skills as a photographer combined with the car-as-camera to create a commercial and gallery exhibition.

Andre D. Wagner for Cole Haan and Theory

Omaha-born social worker turned NYC street photographer, Andre D. Wagner, has been blowing up lately. His timeless street photography has gained him an appreciative audience and broad media coverage with simultaneous comparisons to photographers like Garry Winogrand.

Doing what I do, chasing light and life in @ColeHaan’s grand explore all terrain. #Extraordinaries #ColeHaanPaidSponsor

A post shared by Andre D. Wagner (@photodre) on Nov 28, 2017 at 8:47am PST

Young, talented, black, and handsome—it’s no wonder that brands like Cole Haan and Theory has started to flock to him as an authentic voice of a generation. Plus, he’s still shooting and developing black and white film!

Allen Murabayashi is the Chairman and Co-Founder of PhotoShelter. He's an avid photographer and frequently speaks on how photographers can use online marketing to grow their businesses.

Categories: News

The story behind Kendrick Lamar's Gordon Parks exhibition

A new exhibit of the pioneering photographer who documented the civil rights movement brings together the Grammy-winning rapper’s favorite works

This summer, Twitter was awash in skepticism when California rapper Kendrick Lamar released the music video for his song Element.

Some of the music video’s scenes were staged replicas of photographs by Gordon Parks, a pioneering African American photographer who documented the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 1960s.

Related: The incomparable Gordon Parks – in pictures

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Categories: News
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