News

Fujinon MK18-55 T2.9 cine lens: First impressions and shooting experience

DP Review News - 5 hours 51 min ago
Setting up the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens with the Sony FS7 and Zacuto rig. (I accidentally left the matte box back at the office. Shh... don't tell anyone.)

Fujifilm is a respected name in the photography world thanks in part to its highly regarded X-series cameras and lenses. However, Fujifilm is also a major player in the professional cinema market, producing cinema lenses with prices that reach upward of $90,000. The company is now extending its cinema expertise into what it calls the ‘emerging production’ market: users who need capabilities and features beyond what’s available in standard DSLR or mirrorless lenses, but who don’t have a budget to spend tens of thousands of dollars on a single lens.

The Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cinema lens is the first in Fujifilm’s new MK line of Super 35 lenses designed specifically for this market. It will be joined later in the year by the matching MK50-135mm T2.9 lens, giving users complete coverage of the very useful 18-135mm range of focal lengths. The MK line is based on the company’s Cabrio line of cinema lenses, which have prices starting around $15,000, and both lens lines share the same coatings and basic mechanical build. At $3,799, the MK18-55 is still a bit pricey by photography standards, but a relative bargain for a high quality cinema lens.

Sony E-mount on a Fujinon lens? Read our First Look slide show to learn why.

Despite being a Fujifilm product, this lens uses Sony E-mount. (We discuss Fujifilm’s reasons for choosing E-mount in our First Look slide show.) As a result, I tested the lens attached to a Sony FS7, a Super 35 camera that’s popular among this segment of users.

Shooting with the MK18-55mm T2.9

We only had a couple days to do our testing, so I threw together a quick shoot highlighting one of the Pacific Northwest’s favorite sports - climbing - and met up with local climber Jay Griffin at The Mountaineers climbing wall in Seattle. This scenario was perfect for shooting with focal lengths across the range of the lens, as well as for some good follow focus opportunities.

TL;DR - I really like this lens. In fact, I won’t even make you wait to get to the video, so here it is:

Video shot using the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens and Sony FS7 camera. All footage was captured in DCI 4K/24p using Sony SLog3, edited in Final Cut Pro X, and graded using LUTs from Color Grading Central.

I chose to shoot the entire video shoulder-mounted, so I set up the FS7 on a Zacuto Recoil rig with rails, a Z-Drive follow focus, and a Gratical Eye viewfinder, along with the FS7’s remote grip. This is a fairly straightforward setup, but it takes a few minutes to arrange all the pieces so that everything works correctly and is ergonomically arranged for the camera operator

Setting up the rig highlighted one of the important features of the MK lenses: they’re matched. For this shoot I only had the MK18-55mm available, but later in the year Fujifilm will be adding the MK 50-135mm to the line as well; both lenses share the same weight and dimensions. In a two-lens shoot, it would be incredibly easy to switch between the two while leaving things like matte boxes and follow focus in place. Also, since both lenses have identical T-stops it would be easy to match exposure as well.

Using the lens was a joy. As with most cinema lenses, it’s completely mechanical, and build quality is outstanding. Every movement feels well damped, and one gets the immediate sense that it’s a high quality piece of precision equipment.

One place where this mechanical build is immediately noticeable is the focus ring. Unlike most modern DSLR or mirrorless lenses, which continue to spin after reaching the end of their focus range, the MK18-55mm has hard stops.

Working with a follow focus is a breeze thanks to the mechanical lens design and geared focus ring.

It was simple to set up the Z-Drive follow focus with the standard pitch gearing on the focus ring, and thanks to the 200 degree focus rotation angle it was easy to make precise focus adjustments, using peaking in the viewfinder as a guide. The large rotation angle made it easy to adjust for small movements or to follow Jay when he moved slowly. You don’t get this level of precision with the shorter focus throw of most DSLR lenses, and you certainly don’t get it with focus-by-wire!

I didn’t notice any obvious signs of lens breathing, a phenomena that causes a lens’s field of view to change slightly as a lens is focused. Breathing is fairly common on stills camera lenses, and it rears its ugly head when you’re trying to do something like rack focus between two subjects. Cine lenses are designed to suppress lens breathing, and as far as I could tell the MK18-55 did so extremely well.

Like other cine lenses, the MK18-55mm has a parfocal design, meaning it should maintain precise focus during zooming. Still photographers often don't care much about this since it's simple to zoom and then refocus before taking a shot. For video work, however, you sometimes want the zoom to be part of the shot. Loosing focus mid-zoom is a big deal.

Since I was using a shoulder mount rig without an assistant, it wasn’t very practical to test the parfocal performance of the lens with Jay. However, back in the studio I lined up the lens with our studio scene and confirmed that its performance is excellent in this regard; once focused, the subject remains in focus throughout the zoom range.

 Shooting with the Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 lens and Sony FS7.

It should be pretty obvious by now that I really enjoyed using the MK18-55mm. In addition to finding it well designed and delightful to work with, I was very pleased with the footage I captured. Optical performance appears to be outstanding. Based on my brief experience I would have no qualms about shooting a full project with this lens. It’s exciting to see Fujifilm entering this market, and I’m really looking forward to future lenses in the MK line.

Now, bring on the MK50-135mm so I can use the set!

Categories: News

First Look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

DP Review News - 5 hours 52 min ago
First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The new Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens is the first of the company's new line of 'MK' series Fujinon lenses aimed at the 'emerging production' market. These lenses are designed to meet the needs of cinematographers who require features generally found on cinema lenses, who often work in the Super 35 format, and can't justify the cost of lenses costing tens of thousands of dollars more than their cameras.

According to Fujifilm, the MK lenses are basically a smaller version of its Cabrio series of cinema lenses, which typically cost $20,000 or more. The two lens lines share the same coatings and general mechanical design for moving lenses and groups. Between the 18-55mm and the already-announced MK50-135mm lens, the MK line covers the very useful 18-135mm range for Super 35 shooters.

Perhaps the most interesting feature, however, is Fujifilm's use of Sony's E-mount standard, which we'll look at next.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

So why Sony E-mount? Fujifilm already builds high-end lenses for the PL mount favored by film and broadcast studios. But the company wants to address the burgeoning market of independent filmmakers, small production houses, and other professionals using the Super 35 and APS-C formats. Sony has a huge presence in this market, with many professionals using the Sony FS7, FS5, and even a-series cameras. However, there are few dedicated cinema lenses for E-mount, with many shooters using EF-mount lenses via adapters.

This means there's a huge potential market of professional videographers who can be targeted. Also, since these lenses are built to mount so close to the sensor, they can't be adapted to mount on PL mount cameras, meaning that Fujifilm doesn't risk cannibalizing sales of their HK, ZK, and XK range of cine lenses.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

One difference between cinema lenses and most modern photography lenses is that cinema lenses use an all mechanical design. There's no ambiguity of movement, such as focus mechanisms that keep turning when they reach the end of their range.

Additionally, gearing on lens elements allows the use of accessories such as a follow focus (a geared control that allows fine-grained, smooth control over focus, often relocated to a more convenient position). The gearing also allows motorized control of any of theses rings, if the lens itself is buried too deeply in a rig or placed on a shoulder mount or Steadicam, where direct access is not practical.

The Fujinons both use the industry-standard 0.8 gear pitch, which allows them to be used with the broadest range of existing accessories.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

An important aspect of cinema lenses is that lens sets are often matched so that lenses are the same (or very similar) size and weight, which facilitates easy switching and doesn’t require the entire camera rig to be modified or rebalanced when a lens change occurs. This way, it’s easy to switch lenses while keeping things such as matte boxes, follow focus, or stabilization systems in place. 

Lenses in a set typically have the same T-stop to insure perfectly consistent exposure when switching lenses, as well as producing the same color and contrast.

The MK lenses appear to achieve this. The MK18-55mm and MK 50-135mm lenses have the exact same weight, dimensions, front diameter, and filter size, which should make it easy to switch between them without issue.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The MK18-55mm lens, as well as the upcoming MK50-135mm version, are both T2.9 lenses. Unlike F-stops, which are based on the physical aperture size of a lens, T-stops indicate the actual amount of light transmission for the lens. This makes it possible to switch lenses with the confidence that all lighting and exposure settings will be consistent when a lens change occurs, and that all footage can be matched very closely.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

The focus system of this lens is designed to meet the needs of cinematographers. It has 200 degrees of focus rotation, allowing for very precise focus adjustments using a follow focus system. Additionally, the focus mechanism has hard stops at the end of its range, making it possible to do things like mark positions for a focus pull with no ambiguity about where focus will occur. In contrast, most DSLR or mirrorless lenses continue rotating even after reaching the end of their focus range, making this extremely difficult.

The lens also includes precise distance marks. This may not be a big deal to still photographers, who typically focus through the lens or on an LCD screen, but it's important if you have a separate focus puller who's trying to follow the action in a 'blocked' scene, where all the action takes place at prearranged distances.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

Another feature that is hugely valuable for video work, yet not generally important for stills, is a parfocal design.

Parfocal zooms maintain focus at the same distance, even when you change the focal length. This is of little value in the autofocus world of stills shooting: it's trivial to get the lens to refocus after a zoom and before you fire the shutter. But in the realm of video shooting, where the process of zooming the lens may be part of the final product, you can't afford for the footage to drop out of focus, mid shot.

The parfocal design means, for instance, you can frame a wide-shot of a two-person interview and then zoom-in on one of the subjects, without them dropping out of focus. Both of the Fujinon lenses exhibit parfocal behavior. Zoom can be adjusted using the included lever or via the lens gearing.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

In addition to parfocal design, another desirable property of cinema lenses is that they don't exhibit lens breathing, a phenomena in which adjusting the focus of a lens slightly changes the field of view at the same time.

As with parfocal design, this isn't a big issue for most still photographers as only the 'decisive moment' is being captured. For cinematographers, however, adjusting focus during a shot is very common (racking between two subjects, for example), and it's distracting to the audience when this also causes the field of view to shift. As such, the MK18-55mm is designed to suppress lens breathing during focus operations.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

In addition to regular shooting, the MK18-55mm also includes a macro function that makes it possible to focus within a few inches of the front lens element. It's probably not something most people will use all the time, but if you need a macro shot in your production it allows you to capture the footage without bringing in a non-standard lens.

Additionally, and consistent with being developed alongside studio-quality lenses, the MK lenses feature an adjustment flange to correct back focus. In video circles, 'back focus' refers to the distance at which the lens is attempting to focus its image: and perfect performance can require very slight adjustment to correct for any manufacturing tolerances. Studio cameras often allow tiny movements of their mount to ensure the correct lens to sensor distance. Since the MK lenses are likely to be used on cameras without this correction, it's included in the lens, instead.

First look: Fujinon MK18-55mm T2.9 cine lens

One of the most exciting aspects about the Fujinon MK lenses requires taking another look at why these are going to be E-mount lenses.

In addition to a potential market of E-mount videographers, and Sony's willingness to share its E-mount specification, there's another reason we suspect Fujifilm has gone with E rather than EF or PL: the similarity to its own X mount. While the details differ, the flange-back distances of the two mounts vary by only 0.3mm, meaning that any optical design that works for the E-mount should work similarly well for Fujifilm's X-mount.

In fact, Fujifilm has already announced that X-mount versions of these lenses are being developed for launch later this year, which raises the question: is Fujifilm really expecting owners of current X-mount cameras to spend $4000 on video-specific lenses? Or does this lens, and all the work done on developing the X-T2's 4K capabilities, herald a more substantial entry for Fujifilm into the semi-pro video space?

Categories: News

Fujifilm launches MK series of cinema lenses with 18-55mm T2.9 and 50-135mm T2.9

DP Review News - 5 hours 52 min ago
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Fujifilm has announced a pair of 'MK' Super 35 cinema lenses for Sony's E-mount, with a 18-55mm T2.9 launching next month, followed by a 50-135mm T2.9 arriving this summer. In addition to the E-mount versions, which are designed for Super 35 or APS-C sensors, Fujifilm will be releasing the same lenses for X-mount by the end of the year.

Both lenses are exactly the same size – 85mm tall and 206mm long – and each weighs 980 g. They also share the same front diameter (85mm), filter diameter (82mm), number of aperture blades (9) and gear ring location. As you might imagine, the rings handle iris, zoom and focus distance. In addition, the flange distance can be adjusted for use on different cameras.

The lenses are designed to reduce focus point shift, lens breathing and optical axis shifts. The minimum object distance is 0.85m for the 18-55 and 1.2m for the 50-135, with macro functions bringing those numbers down to 0.38m and 0.85m, respectively.

As mentioned above, the 18-55mm T2.9 will be first out of the gate next month, with a list price of $3799. Pricing for for 50-135mm T2.9 was not announced.

Read our Fujifilm MK 18-55mm T2.9
First Look

FUJIFILM LAUNCHES NEW “MK” SERIES OF CINEMA LENSES

Compact and Lightweight MK18-55mm and MK50-135mm Deliver Advanced Optical Performance with an Excellent Cost/Performance Ratio

Wayne, N.J., February 22, 2017 – The Optical Devices Division of FUJIFILM has unveiled the MK Series of cinema lenses for E-mount cameras, which boast advanced optical performance, ultra-compact and lightweight design, as well as superb cost performance. The first in this series to be introduced, the FUJINON MK18-55mm T2.9, is a standard zoom with an 18-55mm focal length. It will be available in early March at a list price of $3,799. The entire “MK” series is designed with the ‘emerging’ cinematographer in mind, whether shooting a live event, online programming, documentary, corporate video, wedding, independent or short film production.

The next in the series, the FUJINON MK50-135mm T2.9*1, will be available this summer. With a combined focal length range of 18mm-135mm in the Super 35mm format, together the first two “MK” lenses cover the most frequently used range utilized by emerging cinematographers. The series offers fast lenses with T2.9 speed across the entire zoom range, enabling a shallow depth-of-field.

“The rapid growth in popularity of content produced by emerging cinematographers has expanded the use of cinema and digital photographic cameras,” said Tom Fletcher, Director of Sales, Optical Devices Division of FUJIFILM. “And the heightened need for programming has, in turn, boosted demand for high-performance cinema lenses, which are ideal to achieve a shallow depth-of-field and a beautiful bokeh. However, since they are typically large, heavy and expensive, those involved in online and other lower cost productions often opt for interchangeable lenses for digital cameras, which have been more affordable and mobile. The problem is that interchangeable lenses for digital cameras are designed primarily for shooting stills, and therefore prone to focus shift and optical axis shift while zooming.” 

The “MK” lenses are designed to maintain consistent color temperature with all FUJINON cinema lenses, which simplifies color grading*2. The series also inherits the FUJINON cine lenses’ advanced edge-to-edge optical performance and low distortion*3, while boasting compact and lightweight design as well as outstanding cost/performance. The MK18-55 and MK50-135mm weigh in at a light 980 grams/2.16 lbs with front diameters of 85mm and lengths of 206mm. The MK18-55mm’s minimum object distance (MOD) is .85 meters/2.78 feet, while the MK 50-135mm’s MOD is 1.2m/3.93 feet. 

“Many independent shooters use DSLR lenses, which aren’t designed for moving images. Still lenses breathe considerably, and they have no adjustable manual iris,” said Fletcher. “Our MK’s have a seamless manual iris, zero breathing, no ramping or zoom shift, and 200-degree focus rotation. They maintain focus completely throughout the zoom range while covering Super 35mm sensors.”

In addition to their lightweight and compact build, the “MK” lenses are designed from the ground up with the operator in mind. Only one matte box and one filter size are needed between the lenses. Time-saving features include a macro function that allows for a broader range of close-up shooting, and gears for the three rings are positioned in the exact same place, which eliminates the need to re-position accessories when switching lenses.

The lenses each contain a Flange Focal Distance adjustment function*4 to achieve optimal camera and lens matching. The short flange focal distance contributes to the lenses’ compact size and lightweight. Distances are listed in feet and meters.

The iris supports seamless adjustment that is free of clicking. This enables precise exposure adjustment without any sound from clicking between T-stops.

The lenses also feature three rings for manual and independent adjustment of focus, zoom, and iris (aperture), with the gear pitch*5 of 0.8M (module). The focus ring can rotate fully up to 200 degrees to facilitate precise focusing.

The “MK” lenses are compatible with E-mount*6 cameras with the Super 35mm*/ APS-C sensor.

X Mount versions of the MK lenses (with focal lengths of 18-55mm and 50-135mm) used in the FUJIFILM X Series line of digital cameras (with APS-C sensors) are being developed for launch by the end of this year. Information about the X Mount lenses will be provided as soon as more details are confirmed. 

See our latest lens roadmap for the X Series on February 22 for more information:

http://www.fujifilm.com/products/digital_cameras/xf_lens/roadmap/index.html

View footage shot by DP Philip Bloom in Gran Canaria using an MK18-55mm T2.9 lens and Sony FS7, FS5 and A7S II cameras:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Cx66LKDPTc

Watch behind the scenes: FUJINON MK18-55mm T2.9 shot by Bloom:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YX_55s4s6Ro

Key:

*1 T-stop value is an index that indicates brightness of a lens based on its F-stop value and transmission rate. The smaller the value, the greater amount of light the lens transmits.
*2* Processes of correcting colors during movie editing
*3 Distortion refers to a phenomenon in which an image formed through a lens becomes partially contracted or extended at the edges.
*4 The position of lenses’ image-forming plane can be adjusted according to each camera’s flange focal distance (distance from lens mounting reference plane to sensor)
*5 Distance between gear teeth
*6 Lens mount format developed by SONY Corporation

Fujinon MK 18-55mm T2.9 / 50-135mm T2.9 Specifications  Fujinon MK 18-55mm T2.9Fujinon MK 50-135mm T2.9Principal specificationsLens typeZoom lensMax Format size35mm FFFocal length18–55 mm50–135 mmImage stabilizationNoLens mountSony EApertureMaximum apertureF2.8Minimum apertureF22Aperture ringYesNumber of diaphragm blades9Aperture notesSeamless iris mechanismFocusMinimum focus0.38 m (14.96″)0.85 m (33.46″)AutofocusNoFull time manualYesFocus methodInternalDistance scaleYesDoF scaleNoPhysicalWeight980 g (2.16 lb)Diameter85 mm (3.35″)Length206 mm (8.11″)Zoom methodRotary (internal)Power zoomNoFilter thread82.0 mmHood suppliedYesTripod collarNo
Categories: News

ADOX is doubling the size of its film production plant in Germany

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 19:47

The analog revival seems to roll on, as film producer ADOX has announced it's doubling the size of its facility that produces photographic chemicals, film and papers. This latest facility comes shortly after ADOX acquired a facility in Marley, Switzerland, which itself joined the company’s Berlin facilities. The new production plant is being constructed alongside the company's current 'crowded and stuffed' facility in Germany.

Per a statement from ADOX, the additional space will enable ADOX to construct additional laboratories, a new emulsifying machine, build a large freezer for storing master rolls, incorporate a Super 8 production line, relocate its packaging factory and setup more offices. 

Via: PhotoRumors, DSLR Magazine

Categories: News

iPhone 8 front camera rumored to capture 3D images

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 19:04

Last week it was reported that Apple might be replacing the Touch ID fingerprint reader with 3D facial recognition on the top-of-the-line model of the upcoming iPhone 8 series. Now these rumors have become more substantiated by another report by Apple analyst KGI Ming-Chi Kuo which has been published today and obtained by 9to5Mac.

According to the report, the upcoming iPhone top model, which is also expected to feature an OLED display, will come with a technology that combines 2D images captured by the front camera with depth data from an infrared module to record 3D information. The application for this new front camera technology could include facial recognition, iris recognition, and 3D selfies. It could also be used in innovative games that allow for replacing a 3D-avatar's head with the head of the phone's user or for augmented reality purposes. 

If the report is correct, the infrared transmitter will use vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser technology from a company called Lumentum and the IR receiver will be manufactured by Foxconn/Sharp. The front camera will be supplied by Sony. The hardware will be controlled by algorithms developed by PrimeSense, a company that Apple acquired in 2013. The system works by emitting invisible IR light and then detecting the signals that are reflected by objects in the proximity using a 1.4 megapixel IR receiver. The resulting system will have much more advanced depth-sensing capabilities than the existing iPhone 7 Plus dual rear camera that uses the optical parallax offset of its two lenses to determine the distance to objects in the scene. 

As usual, there is no guarantee the rumored feature will actually materialize in the final product. That said, it certainly looks as if Apple is preparing something special for its 2017 iPhone generation. Unfortunately, another rumor is saying the flagship model might set you back upwards of $1000.

Categories: News

Eileen Ramsay obituary

Photographer who found a specialist niche in the world of sailing

Eileen Ramsay, who has died aged 101, was one of Britain’s most celebrated impressionist photographers who developed a niche within the world of sailing. She recorded the postwar explosion in small boat sailing and with it the rise of Britain’s Olympic and world champions, along with ocean sailing pioneers such as Sir Francis Chichester, Sir Alec Rose, Col Blondie Hasler and Eric Tabarly.

Chichester did not have an easy relationship with the press, but he got along with Eileen, who was the only photographer he would allow onboard his Gipsy Moth yachts. Eileen also had a good relationship with Chichester’s rather daunting wife, Sheila, who managed her husband’s transatlantic and round-the-world adventures. “Francis was fun to be around and always had a bottle of champagne open,” Eileen recorded in her memoirs. “I also got on well with his wife – I had to because she controlled all the publicity – and in the end we became firm friends, too. It was Sheila who asked my advice about wearing a trouser suit when the Queen knighted Sir Francis immediately after his successful solo circumnavigation in 1967. It proved a controversial choice within royal circles, but I told her it was the only practical thing to wear sailing Gipsy Moth IV up the Thames and then having to jump over guard rails to get ashore at Greenwich.”

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Categories: News

Best photos of the day: Rule Britannia and mini frogs

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including preparations for Mainz carnival and newly discovered miniature night frogs

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Categories: News

Women Photograph is a directory of female photographers

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 13:00

Women Photograph is an online directory of female photographers. What started as a spreadsheet has grown to a database over 500 members strong thanks to its creator Daniella Zalcman, a freelance documentary photographer. We asked her a few questions about her experiences, the directory and its origins.

What has your own experience been like as a female photographer in a male dominated field?

At the beginning, it was definitely tough. I started stringing as a news photographer in New York when I was 19, and it was very much a boy's club back then. Getting anyone to take me seriously was always a challenge, and I can't tell you the number of times I had a male photographer try to adjust the settings on my camera for me or make a joke about the size of my lens. There was a lot of casual sexual harassment that I think I and many of my female colleagues normalized for a long time — sometimes it's just easier to shrug and move on. But I've done enough shrugging.

Now, I'm a relatively established photographer and I spend most of my time working on long form documentary projects on my own. I rarely interact with news photographer scrums, or even assigning editors, so I'm able to avoid the more frustrating interactions. But I see young women coming up in the field, and I see the attrition rates between photojournalism school and photographers in the first 3-5 years of their careers, and I know what they're going through. And something needs to change.

What inspired you to create Women Photograph? How did it start?

It started with a Google Form last July. I was frustrated by the number of photo editors who were telling me they didn't know where to find women photographers, so I wanted to have a resource on hand that would render that excuse invalid.

How many photographers are included now?

Right now, the private database (which includes more complete information like e-mails, phone numbers, languages spoken, geographical areas of expertise, HEFAT/PPE info, and so on) has 525 members. The site is a little slower to build out because it requires that each photographer send me an image and I'm manually entering them all — so it's probably at around 300 right now.

What’s the response to it been like so far?

It's been great! It's provoked a lot of good conversations, which is really what I'm hoping for. If the presence of this site at least makes photo editors who traditionally rely on the same cadre of male news photographers think about their hiring practices, then I think that's a good start.

Why do you think it’s important to hire female photographers?

This isn't just about equality in hiring practices — though obviously that's important to me too. It's about making sure that the people in charge of visually documenting our diverse, complex world are diverse themselves. We can't look at everything through a predominantly white, male gaze — that's irresponsible and, frankly, colonial. We need our storytellers to be as diverse as our audience and our subjects.

Categories: News

2016 Challenge of Challenges winners announced

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 11:00

The votes have been tallied and we have a winner! DPR member cand1d's image of a glowing sunset in Bagan, Myanmar takes top honors in the 2016 Challenge of Challenges competition. The photo is one of almost 1000 challenge-winning entries. See how your votes ranked the top 25 images, and head to our challenges page if you're feeling inspired.

See the 2016 Challenge of Challenges Winners

Categories: News

Eyewitness: Lake Puma Yumco, Tibet

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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Categories: News

Neural network converts Game Boy Camera images into color photos

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 09:00

We've seen a lot of research lately that uses neural networks to upsample low resolution images and the results have been impressive – even a little creepy. Google recently showcased a system that can turn a low resolution 8x8 input image into a 32x32 sample that's remarkably close to the original image. Inspired by recent breakthroughs, research engineer Roland Meertens found another application for neural networks – one that's highly relevant to our interests. He created an application that turns low-res, monochrome Game Boy Camera images into photorealistic color images.

Original images in the center, Game Boy-ified images on the left and image generated by neural network on the right

A network must be trained, and training means feeding it input images. To create a training data set, Meertens gave some 'real life images' a Game Boy Camera treatment by re-creating them in four shades of black. By comparing the Game Boy-ified images with the originals, the network is 'taught' how to convert the images to color. With the network trained and ready, Meertens began testing it on celebrity photos as well as images from the Game Boy Camera (including the game's mysterious character at the top of the page).

Finally, Meertens uses the application on an image taken with the Game Boy Camera. Naturally, it should be a selfie, as it is here. If you have all of the necessary components, taking a photo with the Game Boy camera is easy. Getting it onto your computer is another story. Lacking a specialized cable, Meertens did his best to photograph the Game Boy screen. As a result the lighting is slightly uneven, which affects the output from the network, but the re-creation is still pretty darn cool. Our hats are off to him.

Categories: News

Coloured skin: the body art of Aida Muluneh – in pictures

Ethiopian photographer Aida Muluneh returned to her homeland to cut through the cliches of ‘animals, war, and famine’ with ultra-colourful images

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Categories: News

Sigma announces 14mm F1.8, 24-70mm F2.8 and 135mm F1.8 Art lenses

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 05:00
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Sigma has released a trio of its high-end 'Art' lenses: two primes and one zoom. All three are designed for full-frame Canon, Nikon and Sigma bodies.

The first is the ultra-wide 14mm F1.8 DG HSM, which Sigma claims is the 'world's first and only F1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens.'  The lens has 16 elements, three of which are FLD (low dispersion) and four are SLD (super-low-dispersion). It also has a large (80mm) aspherical front element to reduce distortion and 'deliver outstanding image quality from the center to the edges.' The 14mm F1.8 has 9 rounded aperture blades, a minimum focus distance of 27cm/11in and a ring-type ultrasonic (HSM) focus motor.

Next up is the Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM Art. This lens features three SLD and four aspherical, nine rounded aperture blades and optical image stabilization. The lens is weather-sealed and made of a combination of metal and 'thermally stable composite' material. The minimum focus distance of the 24-70 is 37cm/14.5in and it uses 82mm filters.

Last, but certainly not least, is the 135mm F1.8 DG HSM telephoto prime. Sigma says that this lens 'offers the [...] resolution required for 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs.' It has a hypersonic (ring-type ultrasonic) focus motor that delivers fast (and 'exceptionally stable') focus speeds, while an acceleration sensor 'detects the orientation of the lens' so the AF system can respond to 'varying loads on the focusing group due to gravity.'

The lens has 9 rounded aperture blades, dust and splashproof construction, and a weight of 1130g/40.2oz.

Pricing and availability for all three lenses will be announced at a date to be determined.

Press Releases:

SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM
Introducing the world’s first and only* F1.8 ultra-wide-angle lens

A true high-speed lens that delivers a new dimension of visual experience

*Among interchangeable lens for digital SLRs as of February 2017

  1. 14mm ultra-wide angle of view and F1.8 brightness deliver a new dimension of visual experience
  2. Seventh 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line
  3. Other features 

A true high-speed lens that delivers a new dimension of visual experience

In taking photographs of starry skies or other celestial scenes at night, or of the seashore with a wide perspective, a large-diameter lens is a strong ally, since it allows the capture of a moving subject by adjusting shutter speed without relying on ISO sensitivity. With its full-frame 35mm coverage, 14mm focal length for an ultra-wide angle of view, F2 barrier-breaking F1.8, the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art is the true high-speed ultra-wide-angle lens for which so many photographers have been waiting. Although some zoom lenses are available that can cover 14mm, the large diameter delivering F1.8 brightness is a singular advantage. Going beyond fast shutter speed, this lens can capture a swarm of fireflies with crystal clarity, a beautiful bokeh effect, and outstanding control of light streaking.

【Key features】

  1. 14mm ultra-wide angle of view and F1.8 brightness deliver a new dimension of visual experience

By leveraging its extreme angle of view and the dramatic perspective this creates, an ultra-wide-angle lens can get up close and personal with a subject while at the same time taking in a vast background—an example of photography going beyond normal human vision.

SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art combines the extremely deep depth of field that comes from an ultra-wide angle of view with the extremely shallow depth of field that comes from F1.8 brightness. The result is a sharply captured subject set against a vast background dramatically blurred with a beautiful bokeh effect. It is a highly impressive mode of photographic expression that until now simply has not existed.

  • Minimized chromatic aberrations

Three FLD (“F” Low Dispersion) glass elements and four SLD (Super Low Dispersion) glass elements help minimize transverse chromatic aberration, which tends to be noticeable in shots taken with ultra-wide-angle lenses. The result is outstanding image quality from the center of the image to the edges.

  • Featuring a large-diameter aspherical lens element

The SIGMA 12-24mmF4 DG HSM | Art was the first SIGMA lens to feature a large ⌀80mm aspherical lens element. Building on the expertise derived from this success, the new lens features a large ⌀80mm precision-molded glass aspherical lens as its front element. This technology has made possible the 14mm F1.8 specification—the first of its kind.

  • Minimized distortion

Serving as the front lens element, the large ⌀80mm precision-molded glass aspherical lens effectively minimizes distortion. Offering excellent peripheral brightness, this lens delivers outstanding image quality from the center to the edges.

  • Distinctive bokeh effect

Even at the 14mm ultra-wide-angle of view, F1.8 brightness makes possible a very shallow depth of field with the subject standing out dramatically against a bokeh background. It’s the unique mode of expression that only a large-diameter lens can deliver. 

  1. Seventh 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line

Launched in 2012, the SIGMA 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art was the first lens in the Art line. Since then, SIGMA has developed a wide variety of lenses for the line, and the SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art is the seventh prime lens in the line to offer 35mm full-frame coverage. Now even stronger, the Art line sets the new standard for prime lenses in the ultra-high-megapixel era.

  1. Other features
  • Fast AF with full-time manual override

Note: The operation of full-time MF may vary based on mount type

  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release
SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM
Top-level performance optimized for the era of ultra-high-megapixel cameras
  1. The large-diameter standard zoom ideal for today’s ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras
  2. OS functionality and newly designed HSM for success on any shoot
  3. Lens barrel designed for high rigidity
  4. Other features 

The definitive large-diameter standard zoom lens for any shoot

What photographers demand from the 24-70mm F2.8 specification is much more than outstanding image quality. They want all the features that make this a go-to lens for a wide range of photographic opportunities, including optical design ideal for the latest ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras, hypersonic motor (HSM) for high-speed autofocus, optical stabilizer (OS) with powerful stabilization effect, dust- and splash-proof mount with rubber sealing, and a metal barrel for a stable, rigid feel. This all-new 24-70mm F2.8 lens from SIGMA delivers the performance and functionality that help pros succeed in news, nature, and many other fields of photography.

【Key features】

  1. The large-diameter standard zoom ideal for today’s ultra-high-megapixel digital cameras 
  • Outstanding optical performance

Three SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass lens elements and four aspherical lens elements help minimize optical aberrations. To ensure outstanding image quality from the center to the edges of the photograph, the optical system minimizes coma, which causes points of light to streak, and transverse chromatic aberration, which cannot be corrected via aperture control, The optical system also minimizes distortion, which can be particularly evident in wide-angle shots, resulting in excellent optical performance throughout the zoom range.

  • A 24-70mm F2.8 lens that meets the high standards of the Art line

SIGMA has continuously pioneered 24-70mm F2.8 lenses that are a step ahead of the times. The first model of this specification, SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 EX DG ASPHERICAL DF, launched in 2001. Representing the fourth generation of the family, the new SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM | Art accomplishes a challenging feat in optical design: incorporating optical stabilizer functionality in a large-diameter standard zoom. By leveraging all of its design and manufacturing expertise, SIGMA has ensured that this new lens fulfills the uncompromising requirements of the Art line for image and build quality.

  • Bokeh that is a cut above

At wide-open aperture, this lens offers outstanding photographic expression. The area in focus is extremely sharp, while the background exhibits a beautiful bokeh effect with only slight spherical aberration. Since large-diameter zoom lenses are often used at wide-open aperture, SIGMA has paid close attention to the shape of the bokeh, aiming for perfect circularity. 

  • Incorporating advanced aspherical lens processing technology

Aspherical lenses necessitate refined expertise in the design and manufacturing of advanced, high-performance lenses. SIGMA’s first products to feature this technology were the SIGMA 12-24mm F4 DG HSM | Art and SIGMA 14mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art, which both incorporated a large ⌀80mm aspherical lens as their front lens element. Building on the success of these predecessors, the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art incorporates an aspherical lens element that helps achieve extremely high resolution. This element is much thicker at the center than the edges, and forming its unusual shape is a feat of manufacturing technology. Moreover, SIGMA processes the surface of this aspherical lens element with ultra-precise tolerances that are measured in hundredths of a micrometer. This extremely fine surface allows the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art to deliver a very natural and smooth bokeh effect, without the visible concentric rings that afflict typical aspherical lens elements.

  1. OS functionality and newly designed HSM for success on any shoot

Designed for advanced utility in a wide variety of situations, the optical stabilizer (OS) offers a powerful stabilization effect. The newly designed large hypersonic motor (HSM) offers 1.3 times the torque of its predecessor and exceptionally stable performance even at lower speeds.

* Based on CIPA's guideline. Measuring at telephoto end, when it is attached to the camera with 35mm image sensor.

  1. Lens barrel designed for high rigidity

Since large-diameter standard zoom lenses tend to serve as a go-to lens and see frequent use, the SIGMA 24-70mm F2.8 DG HSM | Art is designed to stand up to the challenging shooting environments that pros encounter. To this end, the lens barrel contains a large amount of metal, while the external moving parts feature thermally stable composite (TSC), which is resistant to thermal expansion and contraction. This structure contributes not only to the outstanding optical performance of the lens but also to its high rigidity and confidence-inspiring build quality.

  1. Other features
  • Mount with dust- and splash-proof design

Since the area of the lens most vulnerable to dust and other foreign bodies is the mount, rubber sealing helps provide peace of mind. In addition, the front lens element features a water- and oil-repellent coating that helps the lens perform well in the rain, near water, and in other challenging conditions.

  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included

The Nikon mount version of this lens includes an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism that allows it to receive the appropriate signals from the camera body. This feature ensures precision diaphragm control and stable Auto Exposure (AE) performance during continuous shooting.

Note: Functionality may be limited on some camera bodies.

  • Fast AF with full-time manual focus
  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release
SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM
With F1.8 brightness, this telephoto lens for full-frame cameras further strengthens the Art line’s prime options
  1. The ultimate 135mm telephoto designed to prioritize optical performance
  2. Fast and nimble autofocus photography
  3. Sixth 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line
  4. Other features  

Introducing the ultimate 135mm telephoto featuring top-level performance

135mm telephoto lenses are often categorized as the foundational telephoto, the first one to add to a lens collection. This focal length delivers a strong perspective compression effect, while the large diameter with F1.8 brightness provides a dramatic bokeh effect. By minimizing axial chromatic aberration, the SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM | Art makes this bokeh effect not only impressive but also beautiful while delivering superb contrast and sharp image quality in every shot. It offers the outstanding resolution required for 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs. By incorporating its latest innovations in design and optical glass and rethinking every aspect of the lens, SIGMA has ensured outstanding image quality all the way to the edges, establishing the new standard in 135mm telephoto lenses.

With resolution so crystal-clear that individual hairs can be discerned in a portrait, this large-diameter lens also delivers a beautiful bokeh effect, giving photographers everything they need. It is ideal for close-ups and full-body shots, with subjects standing out against a pleasantly blurred background. In addition to standard portraits, including bridal shots, this lens is a top performer for live events, with its super-fast autofocus capturing subjects with ease.

【Key features】

  1. The ultimate 135mm telephoto designed to prioritize optical performance
  • Image quality optimal for ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs

To deliver the ultra-high resolution that brings the best out of 50MP or higher ultra-high-megapixel DSLRs, the focus mechanism features SIGMA’s floating system. No matter what the distance from the subject, this lens offers top performance from the center to the edges of the image. By minimizing distortion as well, the lens delivers impeccable image quality—no need for digital adjustment during image processing.

  • Ideal for portraits requiring a dramatic bokeh effect

The 135mm focal length delivers a stunning compression effect: even fairly close to the subject, the telephoto ring allows the photographer to establish a variety of dramatic perspectives. The compression effect truly shines in both close-ups and full-length portraits, making composition easy. Moreover, the large diameter with F1.8 brightness makes possible a body shot with an impressive bokeh background. In sum, this lens puts a full menu of compositional options at the photographer’s fingertips.

  1. Fast and nimble autofocus photography

The large hypersonic motor (HSM) offers two benefits. It delivers ample torque to the focusing group for outstanding speed, ensuring exceptionally stable performance even at lower speeds. The acceleration sensor detects the orientation of the lens, allowing the autofocus system to respond to varying loads on the focusing group due to gravity. Along with the optimized AF algorithm, these features deliver fast autofocus photography. In addition, the focus limiter makes AF highly responsive to distance from the subject for even more nimble performance.

  1. Sixth 35mm full-frame prime lens to join the Art line

Launched in 2012, the SIGMA 35mm F1.4 DG HSM | Art was the first lens in the Art line. Since then, SIGMA has developed a wide variety of lenses for the line, and the SIGMA 135mm F1.8 DG HSM|Art is the sixth prime lens in the line to offer 35mm full-frame coverage. Now even stronger, the Art line sets the new standard for prime lenses in the ultra-high-megapixel era.

  1. Other features 
  • Fast AF with full-time manual override

Note: The operation of full-time MF may vary based on mount type

  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Mount with dust- and splash-proof construction
  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • Rounded diaphragm
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release
Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM / 135mm F1.8 DG HSM specifications  Sigma 14mm F1.8 DG HSM ArtSigma 135mm F1.8 DG HSM ArtPrincipal specificationsLens typePrime lensMax Format size35mm FFFocal length14 mm135 mmImage stabilizationNoLens mountCanon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sigma SA BayonetApertureMaximum apertureF1.8Minimum apertureF16Aperture ringNoNumber of diaphragm blades9OpticsElements1613Groups1110Special elements / coatingsThree FLD and four SLD elementsFocusMinimum focus0.27 m (10.63″)0.88 m (34.65″)Maximum magnification0.1×0.2×AutofocusYesMotor typeRing-type ultrasonicFull time manualYesFocus methodInternalFocus notesFloating focus mechanismDistance scaleYesDoF scaleNoFocus distance limiterNoYesPhysicalWeight1170 g (2.58 lb)1130 g (2.49 lb)Diameter95 mm (3.76″)91 mm (3.6″)Length126 mm (4.96″)115 mm (4.52″)SealingYesColourBlackFilter thread82.0 mmHood suppliedYesTripod collarNo Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG OS HSM specifications Principal specificationsLens typeZoom lensMax Format size35mm FFFocal length24–70 mmImage stabilizationYesLens mountCanon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sigma SA BayonetApertureMaximum apertureF2.8Minimum apertureF22Aperture ringNoNumber of diaphragm blades9OpticsElements19Groups14Special elements / coatingsThree HLD and four aspherical elementsFocusMinimum focus0.37 m (14.57″)Maximum magnification0.21×AutofocusYesMotor typeRing-type ultrasonicFull time manualYesFocus methodInternalDistance scaleYesDoF scaleNoPhysicalDiameter88 mm (3.46″)Length108 mm (4.24″)MaterialsMetalSealingYesColourBlackZoom methodRotary (extending)Power zoomNoZoom lockNoFilter thread82.0 mmHood suppliedYesHood product codeLH876-04Tripod collarNo
Categories: News

Sigma Announces 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM lens

DP Review News - Tue, 21/02/2017 - 05:00
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Sigma has announced the 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM, a relatively compact and lightweight optically stabilized super-telephoto lens with with a dust and splashproof mount. The lens weighs 1160g/41oz, is 182mm/7.2in long, and the lens' front element has a 67mm diameter filter thread.

For zooming, the lens utilizes a standard twist mechanism, or the front of the lens can be pushed or pulled. It can focus down to 1.6m/5.2ft, and features a maximum magnification ratio of 1:3.8. The optical design comprises of 21 elements in 15 groups with four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) elements and a hypersonic motor with an updated algorithm.

Pricing will be announced at a later date.

Press Release

SIGMA 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM

 Introducing the light bazooka-a new approach to the ultra-telephoto zoom

  1. Top performance with the specification and functionality of a more expensive unit
  2. Compact packaging with uncompromising image quality
  3. Push/pull zoom mechanism incorporated
  4. Telephoto plus macro functionality
  5. Other features 

A compact body and top performance in one complete package

An ultra-telephoto lens with an optical stabilizer (OS) system has several advantages. The OS allows the photographer to take photographs in unstable circumstances. The narrow angle of view makes it possible to dramatically compress perspective and flexible handling of the background. The photographer can thereby make the subject appear to jump out of the image, with the area in focus impressively sharp and clear. Nevertheless, ultra-telephoto lenses have traditionally had some disadvantages as well. As the nickname “bazooka” implies, they have tended to be big, heavy, and therefore burdensome to carry around. With the goal of creating an ultra-telephoto lens that is far more accessible, SIGMA incorporated all of its latest technologies into SIGMA 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary. With its outstanding combination of optical performance and compactness, this is an ultra-telephoto lens that is a joy to carry and use. While keeping the robust functionality and exceptional image quality of an ultra-telephoto zoom lens intact, SIGMA has achieved amazingly compact packaging enclosing 400mm optics. Introducing the new and greatly enhanced “light bazooka” ultra-telephoto zoom lens.

SIGMA 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary offers the compact size, lightweight, and high cost performance of a 70-300mm lens while delivering 400mm telephoto performance. This approach results in a tempting new ultra-telephoto choice for photographers. Offering a combination of stunning image quality and outstanding functionality, this lens satisfies the needs of pros and amateurs alike.

【Key features】

  1. Top performance with the specification and functionality of a more expensive unit

Since its release, the SIGMA 150-600mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | Contemporary has won photographers over with its strong fundamental performance and exceptional image quality. The new lens retains all of this performance in a compact 400mm ultra-telephoto zoom package with a filter size of just ⌀67mm and weight of just 1,160g. Yet it also comes with the full range of features and functions expected of an ultra-telephoto zoom: optical stabilizer (OS), hypersonic motor (HSM) with updated algorithm for fast autofocus, focus limiter, and more. In addition, this uncompromising specification becomes customizable with the available SIGMA USB Dock accessory.

  1. Compact packaging with uncompromising image quality

In designing this lens, SIGMA strived to push both compactness and image quality to the limit. Four SLD (Special Low Dispersion) glass lens elements and an optimized power distribution help minimize optical aberrations. Moreover, by taking special care to minimize transverse chromatic aberration, which cannot be corrected via aperture control, SIGMA has ensured outstanding image quality throughout the zoom range. 

  1. Push/pull zoom mechanism incorporated

For quick control of the angle of view, the zoom ring incorporates a push/pull mechanism in addition to the regular twist mechanism. The exclusive lens hood has also been designed to accommodate push/pull zooming and overall lens maneuverability. By making it possible to adjust the angle of view instantly, this lens gives photographers an even better chance of getting that crucial shot.

  1. Telephoto plus macro functionality

With a minimum shooting distance of 160cm and a maximum magnification ratio of 1:3.8, this lens can shoot either from a distance or up close. 

  1. Other features
  • Dust- and splash-proof mount

Since the area of the lens most vulnerable to dust and other foreign bodies is the mount, rubber sealing helps provide peace of mind.

  • All-new optical stabilizer (OS) unit with exclusive algorithm

Featuring a newly developed gyroscopic sensor and a new and exclusive algorithm, the all-new OS unit provides a powerful stabilization effect. An acceleration sensor detects camera shake in any direction—horizontal, vertical, or diagonal. This technology allows the OS to stabilize the image very effectively, regardless of whether the camera is being held in horizontal or vertical orientation.

  • Nikon electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism included

The Nikon mount version of this lens includes an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism that allows it to receive the appropriate signals from the camera body. This feature ensures precision diaphragm control and stable Auto Exposure (AE) performance during continuous shooting.

Note: Functionality may be limited on some camera bodies. 

  • Rounded diaphragm 
  • Designed to minimize flare and ghosting
  • Compatible with the newly developed tele converters
  • Fast AF with full-time manual override

Note: The operation of full-time MF may vary based on mount type

  • Compatible with Mount Converter MC-11
  • Available SIGMA USB DOCK (Makes customization and flexible adjustment possible)
  • Available Mount Conversion Service (Allows use with another camera body)
  • High-precision, durable brass bayonet mount
  • Evaluation with SIGMA’s own MTF measuring system “A1”
  • Made in Japan (With outstanding craftsmanship)
  • The lens barrel is engraved with the year of release
Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM | C specifications Principal specificationsLens typeZoom lensMax Format size35mm FFFocal length100–400 mmImage stabilizationYesLens mountCanon EF, Nikon F (FX), Sigma SA BayonetApertureMaximum apertureF5–6.3Minimum apertureF22Aperture ringNoNumber of diaphragm blades9OpticsElements21Groups15Special elements / coatingsFour SLD elementsFocusMinimum focus0.16 m (6.3″)Maximum magnification0.26×AutofocusYesMotor typeRing-type ultrasonicFull time manualYesFocus methodInternalDistance scaleNoDoF scaleNoPhysicalWeight1160 g (2.56 lb)Diameter86 mm (3.4″)Length182 mm (7.18″)SealingYesColourBlackZoom methodPush/Pull (extending)Power zoomNoFilter thread67.0 mmHood suppliedYesHood product codeLH770-04Tripod collarNoOtherNotesRotating or push/pull zoom.
Categories: News

Fotodiox Pro launches five GFX lens adapters

DP Review News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 20:58

Fotodiox Pro has launched five new lens adapters for the forthcoming Fujifilm GFX medium-format system. This will allow lenses from other systems to be used with the GFX 50S, though as Fotodiox's website points out, not every lens will give great results. All tilt-shift lenses and many full-frame lenses longer than 50mm will cover the GFX's sensor, but anything wider will produce vignetting.

The new lineup features adapters for the Canon EF-Mount, Nikon F-Mount, Olympus OM-Mount, Mamiya 645, and Contax. The adapters are priced at $150 with the exception of the Mamiya 645, which is priced at $170.

The adapters are made entirely from metal with chrome-plated brass mounts and a 'precise fit and solid connection.' The company also says it uses 'enhanced craftsmanship and high-tolerance construction for demanding professionals.'

Finally, Fotodiox cautions, 'This is a manual adapter, so lens functions that rely on electronic communication with the camera body (autofocus, AE metering, image stabilization, etc.) will be disrupted.' All five lens adapters are available from the company's website now.

Via: ThePhoblographer

Categories: News

Irix introduces super wide-angle 11mm for full-frame DSLRs

DP Review News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 20:16

New optics manufacturer Irix has announced a second extreme wide-angle lens for full-frame DSLR users that will join the existing 15mm F2.4. The new lens is a manual focus 11mm F4 which will come in two versions – Blackstone and Firefly – like the company’s first lens.

Constructed using 16 elements arranged in 10 groups the lens offers a nine-bladed iris with apertures from F4 to F22. Electrical contacts allow users to control aperture values from the camera body and for aperture values to be recorded in EXIF data.

Irix says this new 126° lens is unique because it exhibits only 3.13% curvilinear distortion on a full-frame sensor and shows test images to back up the claim, along with MTF charts that describe the expected resolution.

Available in mounts for Canon, Nikon and Pentax the lens is weather-sealed and comes in rugged or lightweight versions. The Firefly model is 12% lighter than the Blackstone, but the Blackstone is made from aluminum-magnesium alloy, features a metal-grooved focusing ring and has an anti-scratch coating. Those working in low light conditions might be glad of the Blackstone’s engaged markings that glow in the dark. As the forward element of both versions is so large, and the angle of view so extreme, the company has integrated a filter slot at the back of the lens for 30x30mm gelatin filters.

There is no indication yet when the lens will begin shipping but it is listed for sale on the company’s US website, with the Blackstone version costing $825 and the Firefly $595.
For more information see the Irix website.

Categories: News

OPPO to announce 5x zoom smartphone technology at MWC

DP Review News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 18:25

It appears smartphone maker OPPO is planning to announce a smartphone camera with a 5x zoom at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona that is starting next Sunday. Today the Chinese company has sent out a teaser email which hardly included any technical detail but a 'Go 5x Further' logo and  the 'So close you can feel it' tagline, strongly suggesting the novelty will be camera-related.

The lack of proper zoom is still one of the most significant limitations of mobile photography and if OPPO were to launch a smartphone camera with an optical 5x zoom that doesn't increase device proportions too much, it would be a real step forward, making the 2x dual-camera designs of the Apple iPhone 7 Plus or LG G5 look rather outdated. 

“This remarkable achievement is the result of an extensive, year-long R&D process, combined with OPPO’s unparalleled expertise in smartphone imaging technology. We chose MWC to unveil the ‘5x’ technology in the belief that we can inspire the industry to aim higher, and continue to create pioneering products that give amazing experiences for consumers,” Sky Li, OPPO Vice President and Managing Director of International Mobile Business, said.

OPPO isn't a big name outside of Asia, but it is the the current number one smartphone brand in China with 16.8% market share and the world’s fourth best-selling smartphone brand for the second year running. We don't know at this point if the announcement will be for a development project or a market-ready model, but we have seen OPPO putting emphasis on camera features and performance in the past, so we're definitely looking forward to it. We will be on location in Barcelona, so look out for for more detail next week.

Categories: News

Best photos of the day: sunset bubbles and a lemon festival

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, children playing in Chicago and a citrus lion in France

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Nikon PC Nikkor 19mm F4E sample gallery

DP Review News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 12:00

The Nikon 19mm F4 is a wide-angle tilt-shift, or as Nikon calls it, Perspective Control lens. It offers the ability to independently rotate the direction of tilt or shift, making it the perfect tool for keeping those parallel lines straight when working with architecture or interiors. We also took it for a bit of 'freelensing' and got experimental with the tilt function.

Take a look at what is possible when you're given complete control in our real world sample gallery.

See our Nikon PC Nikkor 19mm F4E ED sample gallery

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Categories: News

First look video: YI 4K+ action camera shoots 4K/60p and stabilized 4K/30p

DP Review News - Mon, 20/02/2017 - 11:00

The YI 4K+ uses the latest generation of Ambarella processing chip, making it capable of 4K/60p video capture. It can also shoot impressively smooth 4K/30p footage using electronic stabilization. Other standout features include a 2.2" Gorilla Glass touch display, the best user interface of any action camera on the market and USB-C connectivity.

We're eager to spend more time putting the YI 4K+ to the test. Keep your eyes peeled for an updated 4K action camera roundup coming this spring.

Categories: News
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