News

Photo business: the rise and impending fall of social media 'influencers'

DP Review News - Mon, 23/05/2016 - 22:44

With so-called 'influencers' in the news recently, an anonymous social media executive confesses to Digiday just what contributed to the rise of the phenomenon and the somewhat startling realities of the new ecosystem.

While it may come as no surprise to the general public that the 'influencer' ecosystem is going through some turmoil as of late, it is somewhat surprising that it came about in the first place. According to the interview, it took brands until 2014 to realize what most of us saw much earlier - social media is addictive and engrossing for much of the general public, and it's here to stay.

Instead of a handful of TV commercials to make each year, brands and agencies realized that they needed to greatly increase the sheer volume of their content creation in a never-ending quest for ever more 'impressions' via their social media channels. So, what easier way to get your product out there than to simply pay someone to post your product in front of their hundreds of thousands of followers? Thus, the influencer was born.

'We have no idea what to pay them.'

What started as a simple $500 investment for someone to 'show up and take some photos' has ballooned into paying '$300,000 for a few photographs because the CEO's kid liked someone.' It's pretty absurd, with the executive going on to admit 'we have no idea what to pay them.' Although it appears there's more of a vetting process being developed at some agencies, you still get influencers whose entire pitch is 'I want to take a car and pick it up in London and drive it around Europe, so give me $100,000.'

So it's no surprise that the interview concludes on a bleak note regarding the future for Instagram superstars. The unnamed executive predicts influencers will start to disappear as brands recognize that the value isn't there. 'Just because photos look good and have 200,000 followers means nothing.' While it lasts, it sure seems like a pretty sweet gig.

Via: digiday.com

Categories: News

Photo bomb: Student project sends Instax camera skyward

DP Review News - Mon, 23/05/2016 - 19:43

In what must be a one-of-a-kind project, a visual media student at the Rochester Institute of Technology has installed a Fujifilm Instax camera on a DJI drone, making it possible to shoot instant photos from the air.

Nicholas Kundrat created the drone/instant camera hybrid for a new course called 'Visual Media Innovation Project.' Bringing the project to life started with a DJI Flamewheel 450 quadcopter kit as the base with an Instax Mini 25. From Kundrat's Vimeo page:

'A servo motor was then fitted onto the camera and plugged into the auxiliary port on the receiver to be controlled by the SX6i transmitter. A flip of the aux switch on the transmitter fires the camera and before you know it a picture is ejected from the camera.'

The drone can fly up to twelve minutes with the camera and motor attached. Kundrat hopes his creation will challenge views of drones as dangerous and harmful by creating a positive connection between observer and drone. If nothing else, it brings a whole new meaning to the term 'photo bomb.'

Via: PetaPixel

Categories: News

Magnum Graduate Photographers Award 2016 winners announced

DP Review News - Mon, 23/05/2016 - 19:05

Magnum Photos recently announced the ten winners of its Graduate Photographers Award 2016, providing each graduated photographer with a Magnum photographer mentor, portfolio review and a screening of their work at Somerset House in the UK. The awards were announced in association with RBB Economics.

The Graduate Photographers Award is awarded to photographers who graduated from a 'lens-based media' or photography UK degree course some time in the last three years. During the evaluation process, ten experts each nominated ten photographers from which a panel of judges chose the ten finalists. The following photographers were awarded:

Via: Magnum Photos

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Giro d'Italia 2016: stages 10 to 15 — in pictures

As the riders of the 99th Giro d’Italia enjoy their final rest day of the 2016 race, we take a look back at the best images from the past six days

Click here to check out the best images from the first nine stages

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Eyewitness: Los Angeles

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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London, Paris, New York: a tale of three mid-century cities – in pictures

Uniting three major 20th-century photographers – Wolfgang Suschitzky, Dorothy Bohm and Neil Libbert – a new exhibition presents the beauty, streetlife and social contradictions of three world capitals from the 1930s to the 1960s

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Bikinis and ballgowns: Australian fashion week 2016 – a photo essay

From sparkling gowns by Oscar de la Renta to fluorescent bikinis by Cynthia Rowley, there was an eclectic mixture of clothing on the catwalks of Carriageworks in Sydney – home of Australian fashion week – this year. Our photographer Jonny Weeks captured the action on the runways and went behind the scenes ahead of shows by Australian designers such as Christopher Esber and Daniel Avakian

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X-ray: iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

DP Review News - Sun, 22/05/2016 - 13:00
iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

We're curious people at heart, and we like to know what's going on inside of our prized electronic possessions. But taking screwdriver to camera isn't a wise idea if you want to keep you gear functioning with a valid warranty. Thankfully, the folks at iFixit help satisfy our curiosity with their disassembly guides. So let's enjoy a look under the hood of the Fujifilm X-M1 – from a safe distance, shall we?

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

With the lens and battery removed, the project may begin by pulling back the faux-leather covering on the camera body to access some screws.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

More screws await under the lens mount...

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

...and with the hot shoe cover and a few more screws gone, the back of the camera is free.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

What's heard but never seen? The speaker inside your camera! You knew it was there. This is what it looks like.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

Behind the LCD you'll get a glimpse of the motherboard, veiled by a plastic covering.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

Here's a clear view of the motherboard underneath, with Fujifilm's image processor in plain sight.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

And here's the back of the sensor assembly, just underneath the motherboard.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

There's not a whole lot of camera left to disassemble at this stage, and the top plate can be removed cleanly with the appropriate ribbon cable disconnected.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

Here's a look at the LCD and its articulated arm away from the camera body.

Image courtesy of iFixit

iFixit looks inside the Fujifilm X-M1

And there you have it, the inner workings of the X-M1 laid out neatly for inspection.

Image courtesy of iFixit

Categories: News

Surfing in Palestine: everyday life in the occupied territories

Jovial bodybuilders, sun-kissed surfers, free-running teenagers … can this really be Palestine? Tanya Habjouqa explains her astonishingly fresh take on occupied life

Palestinians were baffled when Tanya Habjouqa first explained her photographic project to them. “They felt a political obligation to talk about their suffering,” she says. “They were startled when I asked about pleasure. They would slowly ask, ‘Pleasure? We don’t usually discuss pleasure.’ While my pictures may seem light and easy, I had to foster their trust to convince them I was not working to show that things were actually ‘hunky-dory’ under occupation.”

She has photographed the only all-women Palestinian car-racing team

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Sweet Caress by William Boyd review – a compendious and intellligent work

Boyd again writes in a woman’s voice in his latest novel exploring art and gender, this time to tell the life story of a 20th-century female photographer

William Boyd’s understanding of British history, which often underlies his novels, and his keen interest in middle-class British life, have made him one of the most admired novelists of our time.

This is the fourth novel he has written from a woman’s point of view. Amory Clay, the protagonist, is a typical Boyd heroine: beautiful, a photographer in Weimar Berlin who becomes notorious for taking pictures of naked prostitutes, fiercely independent, with a fondness for good-looking and intelligent men, preferably in uniform.

Related: A life in writing: William Boyd

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Neil Libbert’s New York street scenes

The Observer photojournalist arrived in the city in the 1960s as a young man and set to documenting his first impressions of its wild life

New York looms so large in the collective imagination, the city a permanent set broadcasting images 24/7, that only the work of a rare talent such as Neil Libbert can jolt us into seeing it anew. In a series of street scenes capturing his first impressions of 1960s New York, he shows the city’s swagger, the cocky young lads, glamourpusses and money men, through the eyes of an outsider, a fresh-faced photographer from Salford.

“New York was very exciting. It was a good city,” remembers Libbert. “Harlem probably wasn’t the safest place to be wandering around with a camera, and there were a lot of bricks being thrown around, but I had no problems.”

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Spring in your step: readers' photos on the theme of bloom

For last week’s photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of bloom via GuardianWitness. Here’s a selection of our favourites

  • Share your photos on this week’s theme ‘bloom’ by clicking the button below
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Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of 'feast'

Wherever you are in the world, we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘feast.’ Share your best photos via GuardianWitness

We’re now running a regular weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review and the next theme is ‘feast.’ So whether it’s an anniversary meal, a celebration or a something spectacular to watch, share your photos of what feast means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is Thursday 26 May at 10 am. We’ll publish our favourites in The New Review on Sunday 29 May and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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Sport picture of the day: letting the dust settle at the Rally de Portugal

Spectators get a close view of Norway’s Andreas Mikkelsen and Anders Synnevaag as they speed past in their Volkswagen Polo R during stage three of the Portuguese World Championship Rally

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Forever blowing bubbles: summer beach days – in pictures

For Hackney-based photographer Emily Stein, the carefree days of youth need not be forgotten when we grow up. Her latest project, Bubblegum, features photographs of teenagers chewing, well, bubblegum. “What I wanted to do was capture the feeling of growing up, and one of the most free places was on the beach during the summer,” she says. “Part of that is all the pastel colours of the bubblegum, the sand and the sun.” Stein photographed friends from around the world: most images were shot in the beaches around Coney Island; others in South Africa and the Caribbean. The photos were shot at different times of day in order to capture the fleeting nature of youth. Her book, Bubblegum (£12.95, Hoxton Mini Press), is out now.

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Women's Voluntary Services - in pictures

During the second world war one in ten of Britain’s female population joined the WVS. Monthly reports were kept and photographs taken to document the work they undertook between 1938 and 1941.

Now the Royal Voluntary Service want to bring these fascinating, previously unseen archives to the public with the help of crowdfunding

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Striking: Photos from a lightning hotspot in Venezuela

DP Review News - Sat, 21/05/2016 - 13:00
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For landscape photographer and storm chaser Jonas Piontek, Lake Maracaibo in Venezuela is practically paradise. The lake's proximity to the Andes and the Caribbean Sea set the conditions for a so-called 'never ending storm,' with lightning storms occurring almost 300 days of the year. You'd even notice it from space apparently, as NASA has named it the 'Lightning Capital of the World.'

You can see a few of his photos here, and over at Resource Travel Piontek describes what it's like photographing Maracaibo's daily light show.

Categories: News

Eyewitness: Bucharest, Romania

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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The 20 photographs of the week

The EgyptAir crash, violent demonstrations in Paris and Nairobi, Leicester City’s victory parade, Iggy Pop crowdsurfing in London, the ongoing refugee crisis in Europe – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Hasselblad offers no-loss trade-up on H6D to those waiting for 100MP back

DP Review News - Fri, 20/05/2016 - 20:47

With the Hasselblad 100c 100MP back delayed by the after effects of the Japanese earthquake the company has introduced a trade-up deal for photographers who want to get their hands on the new H6D medium format body sooner rather than later. The deal allows photographers to buy the camera with the 50c 50MP back now and then trade-up without financial penalty later when the higher resolution back becomes available.

Those trading up will only have to pay the difference in recommended sales price between the two backs, so Hasselblad will effectively take the 50c back for the same amount that was paid for it. This means those who are waiting for the 100c to become available before buying the H6D can start using the new, improved camera now.

The sensor used in the 100c back is made by Sony at its plant in the Kumamoto region of Japan. The factory was badly damaged in the recent earthquakes and is only just getting production underway now, so there will be quite a delay before Hasselblad can get its 100c into the stores. The sensor in the 50c back is also made by Sony, but as it has been in production for longer the company had a stock-pile before the earthquakes struck.

For more information visit the Hasselblad website.

Press release:

H6D-50c to H6D-100c Trade-Up Promotion

Purchase the H6D-50c now and trade-up to the H6D-100c for the difference in price!

The H6D has become an instant success with orders received worldwide and has far exceeded our expectations. The engaging media coverage and encouraging comments from our current and new users has been phenomenal!

Unfortunately due to the recent devastating earthquakes in Kumamoto, Japan, the suppliers of some components, including the 100MP sensor, have been affected.
To get the H6D into the hands of eager customers Hasselblad are offering a fantastic H6D-50c Trade-Up promotion.

Purchase the all new H6D-50c at the standard price and you will have the option to trade-up that camera to the H6D-100c for the difference in the recommended sales price (MRSP).

The H6D has a brand new electronic platform boasting super-fast image processing and faster shooting rates that can be sustained for longer than ever before. The 100MP option, delivers unmatched image quality and the ability to resolve the finest detail with all our HC & HCD lenses.

This unique offer of getting started with our all new H6D-50c applies to both new and previous H6D-50c customers, and will be valid until 31st October 2016.

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