News

Ghost signs around the world in pictures

Lurking in the back alleys of New York, perched above the busy streets of Cairo and clinging to the grimy bricks of London, ghost signs provide an ephemeral link to a citys past

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Meet the ghost-sign hunters

Enthusiasts travel miles to photograph faded hand-painted adverts for products and businesses that no longer exist - symbols of defiance against the citys relentless progress

Theyve just knocked down an unremarkable little building on Latrobe Street, Melbourne, so they can throw up an apartment block sorry, an iconic 43-storey residential tower with a jewel box podium. When the old building went down, it revealed the words Paragon Printers in fading paint on an adjacent brick wall. But not for long: the next time I passed, that wall had gone too, revealing another wall behind it, with a vibrant blue sign bearing the words Henry Richardson, Saw Maker and Importer. For a few days Richardsons name was visible, as it had been 60 or so years earlier. Soon after, the site was nothing but rubble, and now that iconic tower is on its way.

A few years ago, a friend introduced me to ghost signs old, faded, hand-painted signage for products and businesses that no longer exist. When I started looking, all over Melbourne and its and suburbs I noticed advertisements for forgotten products and businesses: Greys cigarettes, Ecks lemonade, Wertheim sewing machines, the Argus newspaper, Noon pies, the Melbourne Steamship Company, Guests biscuits and Preservene soap, as well as countless long-gone butchers, plumbers and dry cleaners.

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Torture trilogies and octopus heads: the world's most extreme performance artists in pictures

From barbershop signs made out of bloodied limbs, living mummies and possessed drag acts, photographer Manuel Vasons new book Double Exposures captures the artists pushing the boundaries of performance art

Double Exposures is published by Live Art Development Agency and Intellect Books

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Josef Koudelka: the man who risked his life to photograph the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in pictures

After years of taking striking photos of Gypsies, the Czech photographer stood before the tanks during the 1968 invasion. He smuggled out his images, they went round the world and he fled to Britain. Here are his most poignant and powerful shots

Continue reading...
Categories: News

DxOMark Mobile Report added to our Amazon Fire Phone review

DP Review News - Tue, 04/11/2014 - 20:06

We just updated our full review of the Amazon Fire Phone's camera capabilities with data from DxOMark's mobile analysis. With an overall score of 69, the Fire Phone lands at 18th on DxO's mobile rankings, tied with the HTC One M8 and coming in well behind flagship phones from Apple, Samsung and Sony. Read more

Categories: News

Amazon launches Prime Photos with unlimited storage for Prime members

DP Review News - Tue, 04/11/2014 - 19:29

Amazon has launched a new photo storage service called Prime Photos, and is offering Prime subscribers unlimited cloud storage for their images at no extra cost. Photos can be uploaded to Amazon's Cloud Drive with iOS or Android apps or the Cloud Drive website. Read more

Categories: News

Carleton Watkins' breathtaking photographs of Yosemite from 1861  in pictures

The definitive photographer of the American west made his name with these photographs of Californias Yosemite Valley, currently on show at New Yorks Met. The series inspired President Lincoln to sign a bill preserving the valleys beauty and laying the foundations for the US National Park system

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Carleton Watkins: texture, clarity and wonder from a true American master

Getting the camera into the Yosemite valley took 12 mules but once they were there, Carleton Watkins captured images that revealed the full glory of the American west

An exhibition of Carleton Watkinss photographs of Yosemite taken in the 1860s has just opened at New Yorks Metropolitan Museum of Art. His photographs show the now familiar, breathtaking views: Yosemite falls, Half Dome, El Capitan. They are grand and stately in their proportions and contain an extraordinary level of detail. Its not surprising that viewers at the time were awestruck. They made Watkinss name as a photographer and helped to influence the environmental movement that led to Congress and President Lincoln turning Yosemite into a national park.

Watkins was born in New York in 1829 and moved to California when he was 20. Soon after, he learned how to make photographs, a medium that was about as old as he was. These were the days of long exposures, glass plates, and processes that not only took time but were messy and toxic. Watkins began his commercial career by photographing Californias burgeoning mining industry for land-claim lawsuits. His images needed to be as straight and correct as possible so they could be used in court as evidence. In 1861 Watkins was persuaded to visit Yosemite by the lawyer and businessman Trenor Park, whose mines he had photographed in nearby Mariposa.

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Sport picture of the day: Melbourne Cup photobomb

Possibly taking inspiration from the Queen, a cheeky young whippersnapper upstages Ryan Moore as the jockey celebrates his victory, which he won atop Protectionist Continue reading...
Categories: News

Photo highlights of the day

The Guardians picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including the US midterms, the beginning of Ashura and anti-US demonstrations in Tehran

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Think Tank launches Perception and Digital Holster bags for mirrorless systems

DP Review News - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 23:35

USA bag brand Think Tank Photo has launched a collection of daypacks and a new holster designed specifically for mirrorless camera systems. There will be three new bags in the Perception series of small backpacks, and will be available in sizes that range from the Perception Tablet that is suitable for a body, lenses and a mini tablet, to the Perception Pro which holds a tablet, a 15-inch laptop and a large mirrorless body with a collection of lenses. Read more

Categories: News

High pixel-density camera displays and wide-gamut Cinema 4K panel technology on the way

DP Review News - Mon, 03/11/2014 - 23:03

Reports from Japan's Display Innovation 2014 exhibition highlight a number of advancements and prototypes in camera LCDs. Included are a high-pixel-density 3.2" display using WhiteMagic technology, a high-resolution touch screen with in-cell touch sensors and a 31" cinema 4K wide-gamut display with 99.5% AdobeRGB coverage from LG. Learn more

Categories: News

Elvis at the O2 exhibition - in pictures

A series of images of Elvis Presley and some of his treasured possessions. Part of an exhibition at the O2, which starts on 12th December 2014

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Weather view: your October pictures

We asked you to share your most striking images of the weather in October. Here are the best of them. Thanks to everyone who contributed

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Day of the Dead - in pictures

Observer photographer Antonio Olmos takes a selection of images of Mexicans visiting their dead relatives, lighting candles, decorating their graves and generally dressing up for the Day of the Dead celebrations in San Andrés Mixquic and Mexico City for the Sony RX100 III Celebrate The Streets series

Continue reading...
Categories: News

Photo highlights of the day

The Guardians picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world from a tightrope walker in Chicago to Paddington Bears in London

Continue reading...
Categories: News

The Berlin Wall in the cold war and now - interactive

The city of Berlin will commemorate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall in November. The wall split the city from 1961 to 1989 and became the iconic symbol of the cold war. Sean Gallup has photographed locations around Berlin today to match with archive images of when the city was divided

Photography then and now lets you move through time by tapping or clicking on a historic image to reveal the modern view. You can drag or swipe to control the speed of the transformation

Click here to view D-day landings scenes in 1944 and now

Continue reading...
Categories: News

The beat of Ashura in Iran - in pictures

Shiites take to the streets during the holy month of Muharram to commemorate the death of the third Imam, Hussein, slain along with 72 of his comrades in a battle against the army of the seventh-century caliph Yazid. The large drums, or tabl, were used in battle to alert the public, disorient the enemy and direct troops. In keeping with the military nature of these processions, mourners simulate self-flagellation with light-weight chains to the thump of a bass drum and the crackle of a snare. All photos by Khashayar Sharifaee in Irans northwest city of Tabriz

Continue reading...
Categories: News

George Abraham, pioneer photographer and climber: Country diary 50 years ago

Originally published in the Guardian on 9 November 1964

LAKE DISTRICT: An old man of 93 sits contentedly, surrounded by his mountain pictures and his memories, in a room that looks out over one of the finest views in England. He is the last living link with the deerstalker and Norfolk jacket pioneers who founded the sport of mountaineering in this country and the man who first popularised the sport with his photographs and writings. For not only did he take his heavy plate camera into desperate places to picture determined-looking men hanging on to rocks by their eyebrows, but he also found new ways up vertical crags in Scotland and Wales as well as his native Cumberland. And there is even a jagged aiguille high above Chamonix that bears his name. Remarkably, his memories of adventurous days 30, 60, even 70 years ago are almost as sharp today as the wonderful photographs that line the walls of his home. He even remembers his very first climb - Pillar Rock by the old Slab and Notch with the help of his mothers clothes line. There were some Alpine Club men on that Rock that day, he recalls, and they were very kind and helpful and didnt laugh at our silly rope. I thought, What wonderful men and decided to become a climber. And he remembers, as if it was last year his first discovery of a new route - a wet, vegetatious gully in the hills to the east of Keswick. There was a steep bit about half way up with a waterfall streaming down, and I had a drink before tackling it. But when I pulled myself over the top of the pitch I found a dead sheep lying in the water, and the next day I was very sick. He was still climbing at 70, but today he can only lift his eyes to the hills that have been his whole life.

Harry Griffins diary refers to George Abraham, who, along with brother Ashley, recorded the evolution of rock-climbing, particularly in the English Lake district. George died on 4 March 1965, an obituary appearing in the Guardian the following day. See also The Keswick brothers by Alan Hankinson (Alpine Journal, 1974). His daughter, Enid Wilson, was a country diarist for over 30 years.

Continue reading...
Categories: News

The Singh project in pictures

The Singh Project is a photo exhibition that showcases the beauty and diversity of the two most ubiquitous symbols of Sikhism: the beard and turban. You can see it at Londons Framers Gallery from the 3 until the 15 November 2014. All photographs: Amit and Naroop

Continue reading...
Categories: News
Syndicate content