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Photo highlights of the day

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including the UK election campaigns, flooding in Kashmir, spring blossom in Tokyo, the annual seal moult in the Orkneys and President Obama gathering his thoughts

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Sport picture of the day: nervous Nadal knocked out

Rafael Nadal said he is struggling with nerves and self-confidence issues after being well beaten by his fellow Spaniard Fernando Verdasco at the Miami Open in Florida but this image gives another impression and displays perfectly the gladiatorial energy and fight that is demanded of today’s top professional tennis players, even when they lose!

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Cricket World Cup 2015: the best images from the tournament

After 44 days and 49 games between 14 teams, the 2015 Cricket World Cup is finally over with Australia defeating co-hosts New Zealand to take the title. Over the course of the tournament the picture desk has received tens of thousands of images, here are 25 of the best

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Can't stop, must fly: 24 hours at Dubai International airport – in pictures

Dubai International is the world’s busiest airport – so just where is everyone going? Photographers Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer capture some of the characters travelling through it in a single day. Interviews by Erica Buist

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Red skies and abandoned ostriches: the fallout from Fukushima – in pictures

With scarred skies, scratched negatives, shots of shattered railways and dead wildlife, Japanese photographers respond to the tragic events of 11 March 2011, when an earthquake led to a tsunami and nuclear reactor leak

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Palm Sunday celebrated worldwide – in pictures

Feast marks the triumphant entry of Jesus Christ into Jerusalem and ushers in Holy Week ceremonies among Christians across the globe

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The weekend in pictures

A selection of some of the best images from around the world this weekend including Palm Sunday, Cricket World Cup celebrations and the rescue operations in the French Alps

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Matthias Jung's surreal homes – in pictures

German graphic designer Matthias Jung first constructed “surreal homes” as a boy, using scissors and glue in his father’s photo lab. In January, he resurrected this childhood project and created a series of dreamlike and structurally impossible collages with Photoshop. “Working with this program is a bit like overcoming reality,” he says. “If something goes wrong I just click the back button. This is what’s different now.” Taking photographs from his travels, Jung creates incongruous images that are intended to challenge perceptions of space and architecture. “Collages are like dreams,” he says, “or maybe dreams are like collages”

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Your pictures: share your photographs on the theme of 'indulge'

Wherever you are in the world, we’d like to see your pictures of ‘indulge.’ Share your best photos via GuardianWitness

We’re now running a regular weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review and the next rather timely theme is ‘indulge.’ So whether it’s one Easter egg hunt too many, a pamper weekend away somewhere or someone who needs humouring , share your photos of what indulge means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is Wednesday 1 April at 10 am. We’ll publish our favourites in The New Review on 5 April and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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Going, going, gone: readers' photos on the theme of fast

For last week’s photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of fast via GuardianWitness. Here’s a selection of our favourites

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Earth Hour around the world

Starting in Samoa and finishing in Tahiti, the world goes dark at 8.30pm on 28 March 2015 for Earth Hour, an annual event organised by WWF. People in about 7,000 cities and towns all over the world switch off their lights to raise awareness of the need for sustainable energy use, and this year also to demand action to halt planet-harming climate change.

Watch the lights go out by clicking on the image

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Poll tax riots revisited - in pictures

It’s 25 years since anti-poll tax demonstrations swept across Britain, culminating in violence in central London on the final day of March 1990. The Observer covered the events extensively and here is a selection of images from the picture library, now housed at the GNM Archive.

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Eyewitness: Daura, Nigeria

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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The 20 photographs of the week

The Germanwings plane crash, the liberation of Damasak from Boko Haram militants, the Cricket World Cup, the escalating conflict in Yemen – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Readers' Showcase: Raymond Pang

DP Review News - Sat, 28/03/2015 - 13:30

'Whales made me do it' isn't exactly what we expected to hear when we asked DPR reader Raymond Pang how he got started in photography. Then again, he's not really your typical photographer. When he couldn't find an app to help him plan out shoots in advance, he learned iOS app development and created one. Take a look at some of his images and read more in our Q&A. See gallery

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Family life: My policeman father and the Dutch princess, Short People and chunky pottage

Readers’ favourite photographs, songs and recipes

The policeman is my father, Reg Oakes, escorting the two-year-old Princess Beatrix across a London road, clutching her doll. Princess Beatrix later became Queen of the Netherlands and in 2013 abdicated in favour of her son, Willem-Alexander.

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Lee Filters introduces updates to super-wide SW system to fit more lenses and reduce flare

DP Review News - Sat, 28/03/2015 - 00:37

A new version of the Lee Filters SW150 system holder has been introduced that allows compatibility with a broader range of extreme wide angle lenses, and which has been designed to reduce the impact of reflections from the rear surface of fitted filters. The Lee Filter SW150 Mark ll now allows the existing 150mm-wide filters that were developed for the original SW150 to be fitted to four lenses using model-specific adapter rings - with more on the way. Read more

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Adaptalux introduces portable lighting studio for macro photography

DP Review News - Fri, 27/03/2015 - 19:35

Adaptalux has introduced a new portable lighting studio, likewise called Adaptalux, which is designed specifically for macro photography. The design is modular in nature, allowing photographers to 'rebuild' it in different ways to meet different needs. This is achieved using a core Control Pod into which Lighting Arms are plugged, with each Lighting Arm being customizable in regards to color, beam angle, brightness and diffusion. Read more

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San Francisco's $6 hipster buses 'more like a living room'

City links: New York City reconnects to nature, Beijing decides to cut pollution and San Francisco starts a living room-style bus service in our roundup of the week’s best city stories

This week’s best city stories from around the web explore counter-pollution measures in Beijing, extreme urban growth in Chongqing, a “rewilding” of New York City, and a simple – yet vital – change for pedestrians in Calgary.

We’d love to hear your responses to these stories and any others you’ve read recently, both at Guardian Cities and elsewhere: share your thoughts in the comments below.

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That’s me in the picture: Hunter Gray is attacked at a civil rights protest in Jackson, Mississippi, 28 May 1963

‘They cut my face with sharp brass knuckles; someone cut the back of my head with the jagged edge of a broken sugar container. There was a good deal of blood’

I am half Native American, half white, and a lifelong activist. I’d been a professor at the almost all-black Tougaloo College, north of Jackson, for two years when this picture was taken. Back then I was called John Salter; I later reverted to my Native American name.

In Mississippi at that time, racism and segregation were enforced by police power and vigilantes. My wife and I started mentoring students who were interested in fighting for civil rights, and in the spring of 1963 we arranged sit-ins at the Woolworth lunch counter where they had a “whites-only” policy.

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