News

Abandoned sports stadiums around the world your pictures

From Phnom Penh and Yokohama to Athens and Glasgow, you shared your pictures of deserted sports stadiums and venues in cities. Here are some of the best

In cities across the world, sports stadiums and venues are abandoned as events such as the Olympic Games depart and regeneration projects move teams and people on. But there are other stories too, as your pictures of deserted places have shown. In Prypiat, the municipal stadium lies in decay after the city was evacuated following the Chernobyl disaster. In Vilnius, a new national stadium was never even completed. Now these deserted places are home to birds and vegetation and some may be demolished to make way for luxury developments.

I went to have a look at the Olympics park in Athens, now mainly semi-ruined. The last event held there was a pro-legalising-marijuana rally.

Sent via GuardianWitness

25 September 2014, 15:24

A construction site since 1987, this stadium on the backdrop to a new 'Akropolis' mall (not on the picture) and soviet style living blocks still needs to be finished.

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22 September 2014, 17:27

Abandoned Terraces at the Prypiat Municipal Stadium, Prypiat, Ukraine. Abandoned April 1986 following the town's evacuation post Chernobyl explosion.

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22 September 2014, 20:12

This was the place where the 1st ww2 POW's of the Japanese were kept on the night of 7th Jan 1942. They were 7 New Zealand Coastwatchers and one British Colonial administrator. My father was one of the coast watchers. The next morning they saw horses training around the track before being taken to begin almost 4 years as slave labourers in Japan. This picture was taken by me on April25, 2012.

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24 September 2014, 10:54

Cathkin Park is a stone's throw from Hampden Stadium in Glasgow and was home to a football arena from 1884. When Queen's Park moved across the road to Hampden in 1903, Third Lanark AC made it their home. They played here until 1967 when the team folded, five years short of their centenary.

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30 September 2014, 22:37

Designed by Cambodia's best-known architect, Vann Molyvann, the Olympic stadium in Phnom Penh was completed in 1964. It was used for executions during the Khmer Rouge era, and now the indoor arena plays host to nesting swifts. There is talk that it will be demolished to make way for luxury high-rises.

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25 September 2014, 14:21

This was taken during a seven-month trip in South East Asia. Laos, as well as Cambodia, is covered with modern-inspired architecture, let to its fate.

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22 September 2014, 14:07

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Human towers of Tarragona in pictures

The tradition of building human towers, or castells, dates back to the 18th century and takes place at festivals in Catalonia, where teams colles compete to build the tallest and most complex towers. A castell is considered successful when it is loaded and unloaded without falling apart. The highest castell on record was a 10 floor structure with three people in each floor

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William Mortensen: photographic master at the monsters ball

Ansel Adams called him the antichrist and wanted him written out of history. But William Mortensens grotesque photographs of death, nudity and torture and are now having their day. Chris Campion pays tribute to a master of the macabre

In a roll call of the pioneers of modern photography, one name is never invoked. From the late 1920s to the 1950s, William Mortensen was one of the most famous and celebrated photographers in America. However, his subject matter which veered towards the savage, indecorous, gothic and grotesque as well as his use of montage and illustration, made him a pariah among the puritanical new guard in photography, led by Ansel Adams, who tried to write him out of history.

For decades, Mortensens work and ideas were kept alive by a small coterie of adherents. Only in recent years has he been recognised as a unique and innovative visual stylist, leading to the publication this month of American Grotesque, the first major survey of Mortensens work and career, which will be marked by retrospectives in New York, Los Angeles and Seattle.

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Nuclear reaction: photographs from the age of the atom bomb in pictures

An exhibition at the Work Gallery details how the devastating power of nuclear weapons affected the visual culture in the early years of the cold war

After The Flash: Photography from the Atomic Archive at the Work Gallery runs from 10 October-20 December

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UPDATED: Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 real-world samples gallery posted

DP Review News - Mon, 06/10/2014 - 06:41

UPDATED: The Panasonic Lumix LX100 topped our reader poll as the most interesting product to come out of Photokina 2014. Indeed, the LX100's combination of a Four Thirds sensor and 24-75mm equivalent F1.7-2.8 lens is big news. We've been testing out this intrepid compact for the past few days; take a look at a gallery of real-world samples and see what it can do. See gallery

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The weekend in pictures

A selection of some of the best images from around the world, from Eid al-Adha celebrations to the Hong Kong demonstrations

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Sport picture of the day: surfing

John John Florence recorded his first win of the year at the Quiksilver Pro Francon in Hossegor, France. He overcame Jadson André of Brazil by a massive 11.43 points as André bombed in the final. Continue reading...
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Photographers Paradise: Turbulent America 1960-1990 review an eye for the surreal and the surprising

Jean-Pierre Laffonts photographs of the United States capture a nation undergoing an extraordinary transformation

In his introduction to Photographers Paradise, Sir Harold Evans describes it as a startling portrayal of the theatrical velocity of American life, its traumatic divisions, its heady ambitions, its heroes and heroines and its unending parade of wanabes and weirdos. That just about captures the power of Jean-Pierre Laffonts extraordinary photojournalism, which is collected here in a hefty book at a hefty price full of startling images from the 1960s to the 1990s.

Laffont is a French photographer who first travelled in America in the mid-1960s on a mission to evoke the chaos and excitement of the fast-changing times. It felt good to be young then and the 1960s glorified freedom of expression, he writes. The country was going through profound changes and it looked like everyone was in the streets protesting. I photographed the sex, drugs and rocknroll generation, the hippy movement, the womens revolution and the astronauts of Apollo XI returning from the moon.

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India's technicolour picture palaces in pictures

As bland, identikit multiplexes spring up around the world, these cinemas in southern India are a breath of fresh air. Built in the 1950s-70s and photographed in 2011-2013 by the German duo Haubitz+Zoche (aka Sabine Haubitz and Stefanie Zoche), the cinemas distinctly western modernist influences are, says Zoche, transformed into something new, with an Indian sense of decoration and colour. Haubitz died earlier this year but Zoche believes this isnt the end of their 18-year partnership. Ill carry on doing artwork in both of our names; shes still present in whatever I do.

Hybrid Modernism: Movie Theatres in South India will be at the Nusser & Baumgart gallery, Munich, from 10 Oct to 15 Nov

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Syrian refugees: We want to go home. That is our dream

As millions flee the conflict in Syria, the regions humanitarian crisis grows by the day. Acclaimed war photographer Giles Duley travelled to Lebanon where he heard some of the Syrian refugees moving stories

Sometimes the photographs you dont take are as important as those you take. Ive just been introduced to Aya, who sits in front of me on a concrete floor, small and lost, and although Im here to photograph her it feels like the wrong thing to do. As far as possible in my work I try and see the people beyond their injuries, illness or situation; to respect them as the individuals they are. This time, Im struggling to do that: Aya is four years old, has spina bifida and is homeless.

I came to Lebanon with the charity Handicap International (HI) to document the lives of some of Syrias most vulnerable refugees; most especially people with disabilities, many of whom are going without essential needs. It has been a difficult and harrowing trip; Ive met many refugees throughout my career, but here I am hearing some of the worst stories I can remember.

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Readers' pictures on the theme of 'beginnings'

For our first weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of beginnings via GuardianWitness. Here is a selection of our favourites

  • Share your photos on this weeks theme on squash
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Eyewitness: Damascus, Syria

Photographs from the Guardian Eyewitness series Continue reading...
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The 20 photographs of the week

The pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong, the Mount Ontake volcano eruption, the continuing crisis in Iraq and Syria the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Original Observer photography: September 2014

Movers and shakers from the worlds of culture, cuisine, sport and politics including Paddy Considine, Anna Calvi, Ed Miliband, Lorraine Pascale, Rory McIlroy, Edwyn Collins, Howard Jacobson and Michael Heseltine all feature in this showcase of the best photography commissioned by the Observer in September

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The rise of GoPro: why wearable cameras make us film everything

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Sat, 04/10/2014 - 08:00
Cheap, high-quality wearable cameras now mean no deed need go unfilmed from the heroic to the to the criminal to the mundane. But how much can we bear to watch?

When Alex Hennessy and Mike Graziano decided to spend five years travelling to 195 countries, they knew it would be a trip worth sharing, which, these days, means: worth filming. A cameraphone would be easiest, an SLR the highest quality. But, for Hennessy and Graziano, there was one essential piece of kit: a GoPro.

Like Google or Xerox, GoPro is one of those branded proper nouns that has been so successful that it has become a verb. With 6,000 or more new tagged videos uploaded to YouTube each day, GoPro-ing is now a legitimate phenomenon. The cameras are sturdy, cheap and small enough to sit in the palm of your hand; they can be attached to almost anything, from a surfboard to a tripod to a recalcitrant labrador. They are easy to use and produce remarkably high-quality video, which you can post online right away. To Hennessys disappointment, though, that formula was not enough to gain the pairs films any online traction.

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That's me in the picture: Graydon Forrer gets a bird's-eye view of that Monica Lewinsky and Bill Clinton hug

'While we were waiting to shake the president's hand, a young woman in a beret pushed past me to get to the front. I had no idea who she was, but she was pretty rude and aggressive'

This is my Zelig moment; the gift that keeps on giving. Every time I forget about it, some American politician gets his or her hand caught in something and they flash the footage up again. There must be people whose faces end up caught in tragic situations at a fire or a bombing. This is just fun.

It was taken in the autumn of 1996, just after President Clinton was re-elected. I was a political appointee in the US Department of Agriculture, and I'd taken a leave of absence to work as a field organiser for the Clinton campaign. I went to two very Republican counties in southern Ohio, rallying the vote, getting as many people out as we possibly could. On election night, I jumped in the car and drove back to Washington DC, where I live. This event came a couple of days later, to welcome the president and the first lady home to the White House.

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Family life: A wonky childhood fringe, Part of the Union by the Strawbs and a fruity fumble

Readers favourite photographs, songs and recipes

We didnt have a lot of money when I was growing up and so Mum had to trim my fringe herself. When we look back through the photos and reminisce, she assures me she started off well.

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Post-Photokina polls - Tell us what you think

DP Review News - Sat, 04/10/2014 - 00:56

We're planning some post-Photokina content and wanted to understand what you're thinking. We've created two polls, both looking for your take on the products and trends of Photokina. Let your voice be heard. Cast your vote

Categories: News

LensRentals' new Keeper program lets you buy rental gear

DP Review News - Fri, 03/10/2014 - 20:07

U.S.-based LensRentals has announced an expansion to its photo equipment rental service that allows photographers to purchase the gear they've borrowed. This gives renters a try-before-you-buy option and lets those who have become enamored with their rental equipment keep it forever. Learn more

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Adobe announces Camera Raw 8.7 and DNG Converter 8.7 release candidates

DP Review News - Fri, 03/10/2014 - 20:05

Adobe has announced the availability of Camera Raw 8.7 and DNG Converter 8.7 release candidates. This version adds support for the Nikon D750, Fujifilm X30 and the Sony a5100 among other camera models. A number of lens profiles are also added. Camera Raw and DNG Converter 8.7 release candidates are available for download now from Adobe. Read more

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