News

What goes around: 6 mid-sized ball heads put to the test

DP Review News - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 19:30

One of the most important parts of a tripod is the head that connects the camera to the legs. Continuing where our previous ball head roundup left off, we've collected six ball-type heads for review that are in the medium-to-large size class. These heads are suitable for most large cameras and lenses, with only the truly gigantic or heavy devices requiring something larger. Find out which ones earn our recommendation. Read more

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RIP the selfie: when Prince Harry calls time on a craze, you know it's well and truly dead

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Tue, 07/04/2015 - 12:55

The selfie was the great silliness of our time, the trainspotting of the techno age. So take them if you dare – the world is laughing at you

Remember selfies? They became a global cultural obsession in 2012, when Time magazine made selfie one of its top 10 buzzwords of the year. For a while, it seemed the selfie was the pop art of the future. Everyone, from teenagers to prime ministers, was taking them, everywhere. The invention of the selfie stick turned the taking of selfies into an even stranger performance.

Then, by the end of 2015, selfies slunk back into the subcultural margins. People still took them, but with an embarrassed shrug. There was no longer anything cool about inanely grinning into your own camera. Selfie sticks were banned in many places, and sneered at everywhere. Time magazine declared the trend over with its RIP Selfie cover.

Related: Simon Schama announces portrait gallery displays with attack on selfies

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Categories: News

RIP the selfie: when Prince Harry calls time on a craze, you know it's well and truly dead

The selfie was the great silliness of our time, the trainspotting of the techno age. So take them if you dare – the world is laughing at you

Remember selfies? They became a global cultural obsession in 2012, when Time magazine made selfie one of its top 10 buzzwords of the year. For a while, it seemed the selfie was the pop art of the future. Everyone, from teenagers to prime ministers, was taking them, everywhere. The invention of the selfie stick turned the taking of selfies into an even stranger performance.

Then, by the end of 2015, selfies slunk back into the subcultural margins. People still took them, but with an embarrassed shrug. There was no longer anything cool about inanely grinning into your own camera. Selfie sticks were banned in many places, and sneered at everywhere. Time magazine declared the trend over with its RIP Selfie cover.

Related: Simon Schama announces portrait gallery displays with attack on selfies

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Sport picture of the day: the despair of defeat

Wisconsin Badgers’ Duje Dukan looks lost in his own thoughts as he sits in the locker room after the Badgers were defeated 68-63 by the Duke Blue Devils to win the NCAA championship
• Duke storm back against Wisconsin to win thrilling fifth title

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I saw the sign: dazzling vintage neons – in pictures

Brighten up your day with this glowing gallery, in which you can time travel to 1955 and ring in the New Year in luminous London, grab a slice of pizza for 15 cents, or enjoy the razzle-dazzle of Broadway in the 70s

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Colorado proposes bill supporting photographers who record police

DP Review News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 22:27

Colorado, U.S. state legislatures have introduced a new bill that, if signed into law, will prevent law enforcement officers from interfering with citizens who are photographing or recording police activity. It is House Bill 15-1290, and it comes at a time when Texas has proposed its own bill on the topic, but with a draconian slant: it penalizes citizens that film or photograph police actions within 25 feet of the incident. Read more

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Sony FE 24-240mm f/3.5-6.3 OSS real-world samples posted

DP Review News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 20:49

In theory, Sony's FE 24-240mm f/3.5-6.3 OSS all-in-one zoom is an ideal candidate for travel photography with one of the company's a7-series. The stabilized lens provides Sony's full frame mirrorless cameras with a 10x zoom range, designed with five aspherical elements and one ED glass element. We put it to the test on landscapes, portraits, and lots of things in between. See gallery

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Meat, cheese and lots of calories: MLB stadium foods – in pictures

With the Major League Baseball season getting under way this week, here’s a look at some of the gut-busting food for sale at America’s ballparks

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Studio Update: Nikon D7200 and Panasonic GF7 added to comparison tool

DP Review News - Mon, 06/04/2015 - 16:00

Monday got you down? We've got something to help pick you right back up - our studio scene comparison tool has just been updated. Now included are samples from the Nikon D7200, Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7 and Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS50. Take a look at how they perform against their peers. Read more

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Sport picture of the day: sandy Senegal 'Le Choc' wrestling

Thousands have watched wrestlers compete in the Senegalese traditional wrestling match ‘Le Choc’ at Demba Diop Stadium, Dakar, capital of Senegal. It’s the start of the wrestling season with sand in the eyes just one of the issues competitors have to deal with

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Eyewitness: Tokyo

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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Milan welcomes the 2015 Universal Exposition – in pictures

Milan has been named as the host city for the 2015 Universal Exposition. From 1 May until 31 October, more than 140 participating countries will showcase their best technological and cultural ideas on the theme of ‘Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life’, providing healthy, safe and sufficient food to the planet, while respecting its equilibrium. The expo expects to welcome more than 20 million visitors to 1.1m sq m of exhibition area

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Beyond the mask: Roger Ballen's outsider portraits – in pictures

‘I don’t see my work as extreme. I don’t really believe in traditional definitions of beauty,’ says photographer Roger Ballen. With shots of rat-infested kitchens, pet pigs and gun-waving games of make-believe, he charts the deprivation and creativity in the lives of some of South Africa’s most shunned inhabitants

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Photographer Roger Ballen: ‘I can live with myself’

Roger Ballen caused a storm with his portraits of marginalised and mentally unstable South Africans. Is he merely reflecting a broken society – or exploiting his subjects? Sean O’Hagan meets the controversial photographer

• Roger Ballen’s outsider portraits – in pictures
• ‘Welcome to the Outland’ – video

“People constantly compare me to Diane Arbus,” says Roger Ballen, wearily. “But I think Samuel Beckett is the key influence on my work. My photographs evoke the absurdity of the human condition, but they are also records of a personal psychological journey. For me, photography is a way of looking in the mirror.”

If all portraits are to some degree self-portraits, the photographs Ballen has made over the last 15 years would appear to be evidence of an intensely imaginative but deeply troubled psyche. An American who has lived in Johannesburg since the early 1980s, where he initially worked as a geologist, Ballen is an artistic outsider whose subjects tend to be actual outsiders: South Africa’s poor, many of whom are disabled or mentally unstable. But, where once he went looking for his mainly white subjects in the outlying “dorps” or small villages, shooting them against the harsh landscape in which they lived, he now creates ever more elaborate sets in the derelict houses of South African cities in which the poor and damaged have been exiled.

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Roger Ballen: 'Welcome to the Outland' – WARNING: this video contains disturbing images

Is Roger Ballen's work a faithful chronicle of strange lives in South Africa's outsider communities, or a journey into his own troubled psyche? To celebrate the rerelease of his seminal book Outland, here he takes us inside an unfamiliar world

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Eyewitness: Ouro Preto, Brazil

Photographs from the Eyewitness series

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The weekend in pictures

A selection of some of the best images from around the world this weekend including Easter Sunday celebrations, pillow fights and the lunar eclipse

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Sony FE 28mm F2 samples gallery posted

DP Review News - Sun, 05/04/2015 - 14:00

Sony's line of FE lenses continues to grow. One of the most recent models to be released, the FE 28mm F2, recently landed in our office, and we spent some time toting it around on a variety of Sony FE bodies. Check out our samples. See gallery

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Photography Visionaries review – interesting, provocative, endlessly debatable

Mary Warner Marien’s selection of photography’s 75 greatest practitioners is visually stunning but infuriating for its omissions

“The notion of the visionary is a tricky concept,” acknowledges Mary Warner Marien in her introduction to a book that is a kind of potted history of photography through the work of its greatest practitioners. Marien, an American academic, has chosen 75 photographic visionaries, ranging from the instinctively gifted to the technically innovative. “Some created images that became cultural icons,” she elaborates. “Others experimented with style, expanding the medium’s expressive capacity. Many led lives attuned to the historical events and cultural values of their time.”

Unsurprisingly, her choice covers all the bases, from portraiture to photojournalism, documentary to conceptualism. Thus, Weegee’s raw reportage is celebrated alongside the austere formalism of Lewis Baltz and Ansel Adams’s romantic American landscapes contrasted with the detached serialism of Bernd and Hilla Becher’s industrial water towers and gas tanks. Chronologically, Marien trawls through the history of the medium, the work of each artist summarised in a few tightly written and informative paragraphs.

Related: The best of Weegee's New York street photography – in pictures

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Lynsey Addario: ‘War journalists are not all addicted to adrenaline. It’s a calling’

The photojournalist’s work in conflict zones has seen her subjected to the horrors of the frontline, including being kidnapped in 2011. In a new memoir, already optioned by Hollywood, the mother-of-one explains why she keeps on going back

Lynsey Addario, 41, is a photojournalist who works mostly in conflict zones. She grew up in Connecticut, the daughter of Italian-American hairdressers, and was given her first camera, a Nikon FG, by her father when she was 13. She joined the Associated Press in 1996, and later began working for the New York Times, initially as a stringer. She has reported from Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Darfur, Iraq, Syria and Libya, where she was kidnapped in 2011. In 2009 she was part of the team that won the Pulitzer prize for the New York Times for its “Talibanistan” series, and the same year she won a $500,000 MacArthur “genius” Fellowship. It has been reported that her new memoir, It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War, is to be made into a movie by Steven Spielberg. She is married to Paul de Bendern, formerly a Reuters bureau chief, with whom she has a three-year-old son, Lukas. She lives in London.

You’re used to working visually. What was it like to write instead?
That’s interesting. For me, taking photographs is such a tortured process. I’m always feeling like I’m not getting enough: I’m in the wrong place, the light isn’t good, the subject’s not comfortable. When I’m writing, I don’t bring that pressure to bear. I guess I don’t have such high expectations about it. So the whole process was fun. It was the first time in 15 years that I’d really given myself time to download my experiences. I’d been moving at such a fast pace for so long that I never stopped to process it all. It was therapeutic.

Related: It’s What I Do: A Photographer’s Life of Love and War review – Lynsey Addario’s post-9/11 memoir

Related: Afghanistan women's lives in exhibition at Newcastle

I bore witness to Iraq, and it was a tragedy to watch it fall apart, to watch us go in there on fabricated reasons

Related: Photographer Lynsey Addario's best shot

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