News

Philippe Lopez’s best photograph: a procession after Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines

‘I never spoke to any of them – I didn’t want to interrupt. They were thanking God no one in their village had died’

I arrived in the Philippines 72 hours after Typhoon Haiyan ripped through it, on one of the first commercial flights to Tacloban City. Landing at a destroyed airport was an unforgettable experience: we watched as the cabin doors opened to chaos. There were only a few of us coming in and we could see crowds of people lined up waiting to leave. The passengers on my flight who were from the Philippines had tears in their eyes.

I had covered natural disasters before: the 2011 tsunami in Japan, the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan. But I did not cover these in the same way as Typhoon Haiyan. It was November 2013 and I had grown and matured in a lot of ways, not just in photography. But the pattern is essentially the same: show both the victims and the scale of disaster. It was early days and, editorially speaking, we had no instructions from AFP other than to show what we were seeing and living through. I remember the bodies: the rescue operation was slow and, in some places, there were just piles and piles of them. They were being handled by volunteers, just regular people, which was startling to see.

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Audrey Hepburn and Afghan Girl: the pictures that changed photography – part four

A surrealist advert of Hepburn before she shot to fame, Steve McCurry’s famous green-eyed girl, and Ol’ Blue Eyes on stage at the Royal Albert Hall. Today’s trailblazing pictures range from the 1950s to the 90s

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New photo filters added to Twitter iOS and Android apps

DP Review News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 00:07

Twitter has launched an update to its mobile apps for iOS and Android bringing a range of new photo filters. In addition to new filter options, filter strength can now be adjusted via a slider, providing more control over the final result. Read more

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F-Stop Gear’s Kashmir camera bag is designed for women

DP Review News - Thu, 04/12/2014 - 00:06

F-Stop Gear has introduced Kashmir, a camera backpack designed specifically for women. Kashmir is billed as an ultra-light camera pack with a harness system and torso height adjusted to complement a woman's body, something accomplished through the use of an Ultra Lite EVA-padded hip belt and what the maker says are 'female specific S-shoulder straps'. The bag is being funded through Kickstarter. Read more

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GM5 review-in-progress posted

DP Review News - Wed, 03/12/2014 - 22:22

The Lumix DMC-GM5 is the newest minuscule ILC from Panasonic. It joins its sibling (the Lumix GM1) by offering nearly all of the same imaging features, including a 16MP Four Thirds sensor, while adding enthusiast-friendly features like an EVF and additional controls. We've been looking at how it handles in the field compared to its predecessor. Take a look at our review-in-progress, complete with studio analysis and shooting experience. Read more

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The best of Mike Bowers' #BrickSenate – in pictures

Brick by brick, the Guardian Australia photographer pieces together some of the most riveting moments of the past few weeks in the upper house

Canberra can be a confusing place, and Senate rules mean photographers wishing to take pictures of divisions in the upper house must think again – as only the person with the call (the permission to speak at that point) can be photographed.

Step in Mike Bowers’ clearly-quite-extensive collection of a popular brand of building block to fill in the reporting gaps on happenings in the upper house via the #BrickSenate series.

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Dubai's Palm Jumeirah islands only look like palm trees from space – but that doesn't matter

The man-made islands of Palm Jumeirah appear to grow out of the coastline when viewed from space – this just amplifies the development’s significance to our built environment

This image is a day-time photograph of Palm Jumeirah taken by NASA Commander Leroy Chiao from aboard the International Space Station in 2005. Jumeirah was the first of a series of new islands off the coast of Dubai designed to add hundreds of kilometres of private coastline to the city.

The islands were developed through a process of dredging sand from the floor of the Persian Gulf and spraying it to form shaped land masses. This photo was taken as work on the land mass itself was being completed and in advance of the start of construction of villas and hotels that would house 65,000 people. It was featured in various newspapers and websites shortly after it was taken.

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Any last requests? A gallery of Last Bites cinemagraphs

A special selection of of cinemagraphs from the popular Last Bites series. All cinemagraphs by photographer Emma Lee and assistant Lizzie Mayson, animated by Mateusz Karpow, from an idea by Rachel Vere.

We launched Last Bites in April of this year, keen to know what chefs, cooks and food writers would choose for their final meal. We didn’t set out to strike a maudlin tone, but rather for it to be a celebration of all their lives spent eating, drinking and cooking.

Most of the last meals we’ve featured so far are at once comforting and a treat - they straddle the familiar and the outrageously hedonistic - and, without exception, involve the congregation of the subject’s dearest family and friends. Despite the eerie photo brief for Last Bites - a set table absent of people - the interviews have hammered home that the essence of enjoying a meal is, of course, the people you have it with.

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Russian bathers and LGBT South Africans on Deutsche Börse photography prize 2015 shortlist

Zanele Muholi’s portraits of post-apartheid sexuality join Nikolay Bakharev’s shots of swimmers in an eclectic, political selection

Two South African artists, whose work deals with post-apartheid society, have been shortlisted for the 2015 Deutsche Börse photography prize.

Zanele Muholi, a self-styled “visual activist”, is nominated for her photobook Faces and Phrases, in which black-and-white portraits of South Africa’s LGBT community are accompanied by searingly honest first-person accounts of discrimination and violence. Mikhael Subotzky makes the cut for his monumental book Ponte City, a collaboration with the British editor of Colors magazine Patrick Waterhouse, which looks at life in a towerblock of the same name in Johannesburg – the tallest residential building in the whole country.

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Nudes on sand and Ansel Adams: the pictures that changed photography – part three

Today’s selection of groundbreaking images comes from the interwar period, with glamorous propaganda shots, farmers in the Great Depression and moonrise in New Mexico as seen by the king of landscapes

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Real-world test: Nikon D750 at the Museum of Flight

DP Review News - Tue, 02/12/2014 - 22:28

The D750 is Nikon's enthusiast-oriented full-frame DSLR, featuring a 24MP sensor and a raft of high-end features borrowed from the D810 and D4S. These include a tweaked version of their highly capable 51-point AF system and a very solid HD video specification. We're working on a full review of the D750 right now, and as part of that process we made a short video, highlighting some of the camera's key features in real-world use. Click through to watch.

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Documentary photographer turns to video for 'The Long Night'

DP Review News - Tue, 02/12/2014 - 18:30

A multimedia journalist by trade, Tim Matsui's still photography projects have taken him from native Alaskan villages to Brazilian Air Force training facilities. Matsui shares with us his journey in creating his latest documentary work, from its beginnings in still photography to the adaptations he made to turn it into a video production. Learn more about his work on 'The Long Night,' a documentary debuting this week that looks into human trafficking in Seattle. Read our Q&A

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Audrey Hepburn back at scene of her big break – at National Portrait Gallery

Exhibition of famously glamorous film star shows Hepburn from first appearances at Ciro’s nightclub, which is now part of gallery

Before Breakfast at Tiffany’s, before even Gigi, there was a jolly musical revue in London called Petite Sauce Tartare that helped propel a young Audrey Hepburn into the limelight – a show in a nightclub that is now part of the National Portrait Gallery (NPG).

“It is a wonderful coincidence,” said Helen Trompeteler, associate curator of photographs at the gallery, which announced details on Tuesday of a major exhibition exploring the life and career of one of the century’s biggest film stars. “It is very special to us that she appeared in our building so early in her career.”

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creativeLIVE presents 'The Art of Wildlife Photography' with Tom Mangelsen

DP Review News - Tue, 02/12/2014 - 16:45

creativeLIVE is hosting a two day live workshop with nature photographer Tom Mangelsen. The class will be broadcast live from 9am today, December 2nd (Pacific time) and will cover everything from gear and location scouting advice to wildlife etiquette. It also includes a critique and portfolio review of viewers' images. The class is free to watch live and costs $99 for the rebroadcast. Click through for a link

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Flickr takes flak for selling Creative Commons photos as wall-art

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Tue, 02/12/2014 - 12:48

Yahoo-owned photography site is playing by the copyright rules, but its decision not to share revenues is sparking a debate

Flickr’s latest business model – selling wall-art prints of more than 50m images shot by its community of photographers – has sparked a debate around Creative Commons licensing.

The Yahoo-owned site will keep all the revenues from sales of prints based on photos shared to Flickr using a Creative Commons “commercial attribution” licence, which allows commercial use. However, it is sharing 51% of the revenues from sales of prints licensed directly from members with those photographers.

“I want people to use my photos. That’s why I take them. I want that usage to be unencumbered. That’s why I chose a Creative Commons license. Some of the publications and businesses that use my photos make no money at all. Others make a little something. I don’t care either way. That’s why I chose a Commercial Attribution license. The license makes my work available to all publications and products, whether commercial or non-commercial. Fine with me.

But Yahoo selling the stuff? Cheesy, desperate, and not at all fine with me. I pay for a Flickr Pro account, and am happy to do so. That’s how Yahoo is supposed to make money from my hobby.”

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Flickr takes flak for selling Creative Commons photos as wall-art

Yahoo-owned photography site is playing by the copyright rules, but its decision not to share revenues is sparking a debate

Flickr’s latest business model – selling wall-art prints of more than 50m images shot by its community of photographers – has sparked a debate around Creative Commons licensing.

The Yahoo-owned site will keep all the revenues from sales of prints based on photos shared to Flickr using a Creative Commons “commercial attribution” licence, which allows commercial use. However, it is sharing 51% of the revenues from sales of prints licensed directly from members with those photographers.

“I want people to use my photos. That’s why I take them. I want that usage to be unencumbered. That’s why I chose a Creative Commons license. Some of the publications and businesses that use my photos make no money at all. Others make a little something. I don’t care either way. That’s why I chose a Commercial Attribution license. The license makes my work available to all publications and products, whether commercial or non-commercial. Fine with me.

But Yahoo selling the stuff? Cheesy, desperate, and not at all fine with me. I pay for a Flickr Pro account, and am happy to do so. That’s how Yahoo is supposed to make money from my hobby.”

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Your best night of 2014: share your stories and pictures

What’s the best night you’ve had this year? Share your photos and stories via GuardianWitness

After ClairChapman sent in their suggestion, we’d love to see your Best Night of 2014. Whether it was when you were knee deep in mud at a festival, sharing fireworks with family and friends or front row at a secret gig. Share your photos and stories that capture the highlight night of your year and we’ll feature the best on the site.

You can share your photographs and stories by clicking on the blue ‘contribute’ button on this article or you can download the free GuardianWitness app if you have a smartphone. Please use the description field to tell us more about the photo or video.

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The touching hug photo from Ferguson protests is a blatant lie | Jonathan Jones

It’s absurd that a nation’s new, yet old, encounter with its most destructive division can be summed up by this soppy picture of a tearful hug

The camera is a superb liar. It only shows one moment, and has no obligation to explain the bigger picture behind it. The selective use of photographs can therefore replace truth with whatever visual detail we choose to fix on. Horror or schmaltz, the effect is the same, to simplify reality and turn a story into a deceptively straightforward image.

In the 1930s and 1940s the dishonest manipulation of photographs was a speciality of state propagandists. Backroom technicians in totalitarian darkrooms removed unwanted faces from pictures and turned emotive images into posters. Today, we don’t need propaganda machines to deceive us because we can make hypocritical and self-manipulating choices ourselves just by “liking” the pictures that show us what we want to see and ignoring those that are more awkward.

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Facebook is half as popular as 'dark social' for sharing – Open thread

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Tue, 02/12/2014 - 07:30

Have your say on less trackable social activity, as well as iTunes lawsuit, 3D printing in facial transplants, Flickr controversy and more

We’re increasingly familiar with the “dark web” through technology like Tor, but how about “dark social” – sharing that happens outside trackable social networks like Facebook and Twitter?

Online advertising firm RadiumOne has been trying to quantify the scale of dark social sharing (PDF), with a survey of more than 9,000 people plus data from their online sharing tools to understand how they share through tools like email and instant messaging, which are much less trackable through traditional web analytics.

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Bodybuilders and angels: the pictures that changed photography – part two

A popular Russian wrestler, a Sri Lankan centenarian and the pioneer of hidden cameras all play a part in some of the most revolutionary images ever taken. Today’s selection runs from the 1870s to the first world war

  • Drawn by Light: The Royal Photographic Society Collection is at the Science Museum, London, from 2 December to 1 March 2015
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