News

Anna Atkins: Google's tribute to a pioneer of botany and photography | Rebekah Higgitt

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Mon, 16/03/2015 - 14:36

One of the few women to gain presence in 19th-century science, her book, containing cyanotypes of botanical specimens, was the first to contain photographic images

Today, 16 March, is the anniversary of the birth of Anna Atkins (1799-1871). The botanist is remembered chiefly for having published what was probably the first book to contain photographic images. Google has today produced a doodle that nicely evokes, though hardly does justice to the delicacy of, her cyanotypes of botanical specimens.

While her book was unique, her story is one that speaks more generally to the opportunities – of lack of them – for women in science in 19th-century Britain. The work she undertook and the type of people that surrounded her are, perhaps, typical of the few women who did gain a presence in the world of science in this period.

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Anna Atkins: Google's tribute to a pioneer of botany and photography | Rebekah Higgitt

One of the few women to gain presence in 19th-century science, her book, containing cyanotypes of botanical specimens, was the first to contain photographic images

Today, 16 March, is the anniversary of the birth of Anna Atkins (1799-1871). The botanist is remembered chiefly for having published what was probably the first book to contain photographic images. Google has today produced a doodle that nicely evokes, though hardly does justice to the delicacy of, her cyanotypes of botanical specimens.

While her book was unique, her story is one that speaks more generally to the opportunities – of lack of them – for women in science in 19th-century Britain. The work she undertook and the type of people that surrounded her are, perhaps, typical of the few women who did gain a presence in the world of science in this period.

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Photo highlights of the day

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including Boris Johnson at Kew Gardens, the cyclone on Vanuatu and a very chilled-out cat

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A fresh perspective on North Korea – your holiday photos

As the first western tourists return to the DPRK after a four month travel ban, we profile the best of your holiday pictures. A refreshing change from the stage-managed images often seen of the country

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Bring up the bodies: decorative memorials from around the world

From bone-festooned burial caves in Indonesia to smoking skulls in Bolivia, photographer Paul Koudounaris’s macabre images of decorative human remains and ossuaries reveal that, in many parts of the world, the dead remain among us

  • Memento Mori by Paul Koudounaris is published by Thames & Hudson on 16 March
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Six survivors of Australia's longest-running Indigenous mission – in pictures

Asher Milgate documents the experiences of 18 Wiradjuri elders and elders-in-waiting connected to Nanima Mission, established in the early 1800s in Wellington, in the central west of New South Wales. There is nostalgia in the memories of Uncle Billy Lou, while others like Aunty Joyce Williams pay homage to the community’s friendship with a local Chinese population. But many more voice deep anger and pain, as seen in the oral history of Neville Brown. ‘We couldn’t speak our own language, dance, practice ceremony or eat traditionally,’ says Brown. ‘The kids they’d take were mainly the fair ones, who belong to the white man’

• Survivors is at Western Plains Cultural Centre, Dubbo until 10 May

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Portrait of a photographer: McCullin by Sorapure

War photographer Don McCullin is more used to capturing others in action – so it took him time to adjust to being painted by Charlotte Sorapure

He is used to being the watcher rather than the watched, and at first found the experience of sitting for a portrait rather testing. But the great war photographer Don McCullin managed to remain still long enough for a striking portrait of him – wearing a century-old military trenchcoat – to be produced. The portrait will hang at the Holburne museum in Bath until the summer along with a selection of some of his own photographs.

The artist Charlotte Sorapure, who painted the portrait, said she had been attracted to McCullin as a subject because of his “character and gravitas”. She said: “He was fascinating. He’s very used to doing the looking and felt quite uncomfortable for the first couple of sittings being looked at. It took a while to gain his trust and get him to relax.”

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The Dozen: the weekend's best Premier League photos

We round up our favourite pictures from Saturday and Sunday’s matches in the English top flight

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Famous: the Cairo fashion scene redefining Egyptian masculinity

A photography craze is sweeping the Egyptian capital. The Famous scene sprung to prominence through social media, offering Egypt’s young men an alternative to traditional notions of machismo and turning some into online celebrities

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Readers' Showcase: Maxime Siegler

DP Review News - Sun, 15/03/2015 - 17:42

Maxime Siegler is a DPR reader who caught our eye with his contributions to our black and white Readers' Showcase. We wanted to share more of his work, and he was kind enough to answer a few questions about his photography. Find out how he stays inspired and why he's so fond of monochromatic photography. See gallery

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The weekend in pictures

A selection of some of the best images from around the world this weekend

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Sport picture of the day: sizing up the opposition

The Australian cyclist Richie Porte wins the Paris-Nice race for a second time after winning the final time-trial stage. On the podium he enjoys a joke with the overall runner-up, Poland’s Michal Kwiatkowski. Perhaps size does matter

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I love my mum: the cutest animal babies and their mums – in pictures

Okay, they can’t make cards or presents on Mother’s Day, but baby animals sure do love their mummies as these gorgeous pictures of dolphin pups, wolf cubs, giraffe calves and more show. Camilla de la Bedoyere shares animal snaps from her book I Love Mum and tells us about family life in the wild

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Studio 54: heady daze of disco decadence – in pictures

Infamous New York nightclub Studio 54 was an unholy marriage of disco and depravity. Hasse Persson photographed the likes of Calvin Klein, Truman Capote and Andy Warhol there

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Annie Collinge's Five Inches of Limbo doll photographs – in pictures

Photographer Annie Collinge was looking through Chelsea flea market in New York when she came across a peculiar-looking doll. “I don’t even like dolls, but this one looked really funny, like a superhero,” she says. Over the following months she approached strangers and persuaded them to dress up like the dolls she had bought. “Only two people said no.” When shopping, she says: “I was looking for dolls where I could imagine what they’d look like in real life. I wanted the portraits to be believable.” The series, named Five Inches of Limbo after Margaret Atwood’s Five Poems for Dolls, is compiled in a signed, limited-edition book (£18)

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Studio 54: the ultimate den of vice

The nightclub Studio 54 was the ultimate den of vice, where disco and depravity met in seedy 70s Manhattan. That era is now consigned to history but Hasse Persson’s photographs take us back

God may have made the boringly bucolic country, but the devil made the town. Ever since Sodom and Gomorrah, cities have been synonyms for vice, infernos of wicked delight where prohibitions collapse. In New York during the late 1970s, the favoured location of the beautiful and the damned was Studio 54 – a defunct television studio on West 54th street, reoutfitted as a spangled nightclub where a thousand customers could drink, dance, drug themselves, and retire to a shady balcony to have public sex.

Americans have a constitutional right to pursue happiness; at Studio 54 they pursued frenzy, impelled by a disco beat that matched the rhythm of a nitrate-accelerated heart. In the 1960s radicals agitated for liberation. What they got instead, between the end of the Vietnam war and the start of the Aids epidemic, was a crazed libertinism. Deserted by the middle class, New York was near-bankrupt but its danger and squalor suited the mobs of noctambulists who clamoured to gain entry to Studio 54.

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Your pictures: share your photographs on the theme of 'growth'

Wherever you are in the world, we’d like to see your pictures of ‘growth.’ Share your best photos via GuardianWitness

We’re now running a regular weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review and the next theme is ‘growth’. So whether it’s new shoots in the early spring sunshine, a blossoming tree you planted years ago or a newborn growing up too quickly, share your photos of what growth means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is 19 March at 10 am. We’ll publish our favourites in The New Review on 22 March and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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Worth repeating: readers' photos on the theme of 'copy'

For last week’s photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of ‘copy’ via GuardianWitness. Here’s a selection of our favourites

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Sport picture of the day: NBA heavyweights at the hoop

Sacramento Kings’ DeMarcus Cousins, right, dunks the ball against Philadelphia 76ers’ Nerlens Noel. Both played at Kentucky, DeMarcus in 2009-2010 and Nerlens in 2012-2013. At nearly 7ft tall and weighing 220 pounds the lighter Noel said Cousins is a “big, big boy”

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF7 real world samples gallery posted

DP Review News - Sat, 14/03/2015 - 13:01

After several iterations, Panasonic's GF- series compact mirrorless camera line has settled into a comfortable position: providing mass market point-and-shoot appeal while giving photographers the option to fully control settings. The latest camera in the series, the Lumix DMC-GF7, continues this trend. Check out our sample gallery

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