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Magic with mirrors: Billy Names window into the world of Andy Warhol | Glenn OBrien

In 1964, Andy Warhols dingy Manhattan studio was transformed by Billy Name, a lighting designer who became the artists live-in lover and photographer of the Factorys most darkly glamorous years. Glenn OBrien, a former member of Warhols circle, looks back at a relationship that yielded a treasure trove of pictures

Andy Warhol met Billy Linich when he was a waiter at Serendipity 3, one of Andys hangouts in his commercial artist days and a place where he had exhibited his work. A few years later the artist Ray Johnson, a key figure in the early pop art scene, took Billy to the Brooklyn Academy of Music to see a show and they ran into Andy there. After that Billy began hanging out with Andy at his house uptown and going to openings and movies with him. I was sort of like Andys boyfriend, Billy says.

At the time, Billy had an apartment downtown that he shared with Ondine, who became one of the first leading men in Andys films, and with the dancer Freddie Herko. One day, Ondine gave Billy some amphetamine. All of a sudden I had energy to get up off the floor and start doing things, he says. One of the first things Billy did was redecorate the apartment as an art work, turning the whole thing silver with aluminium foil and spray paint. I even painted the silverware silver.

The only things that came close to conveying the look of the Factory, aside from the movies, were Billy's photographs

The silver Factory was glamorous in the extreme. The dark centre of the world

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On my radar: Amanda Abbingtons cultural highlights

The actress on the old-world folk of the Unthanks, dreamy dresses by Roksanda Ilincic and watching her partner, Martin Freeman, as Richard III

London-born Amanda Abbington started her career as a dancer, turning to acting following an injury. She has appeared in The Bill, Being Human and Casualty, and performed on stage in Alan Ayckbourns The Safari Party and Love Me Tonight directed by Kathy Burke. Since 2013 she has starred in ITVs Mr Selfridge as Miss Mardle, and earlier in 2014 appeared in BBC1s Sherlock as Mary Morstan alongside her real-life partner, Martin Freeman. She is appearing in God Bless the Child at the Royal Court theatre, London from Wednesday until 20 December.

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Readers' pictures on the theme of 'close'

For this weeks photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of close via GuardianWitness. Heres a selection of our favourites

Share your photos on this weeks theme: chill

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Your pictures: share your photographs on the theme of 'chill'

Wherever you are in the world, wed like to see your pictures of chill. Share your best photos via GuardianWitness

Were now running a regular weekly photography assignment in the Observer New Review and the next theme is chill. Share your photos of what chill means to you and tell us about your image in the description box.

The closing date is 13 November at 10 am. Well publish our favourites in The New Review on 16 November and in a gallery on the Guardian site.

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From battlefields to football fields: Remembering the first world war

A selection of artworks from a new exhibition entitled Crossing the Field: WWI, Football & the Christmas Truce, which takes inspiration from the 1914 Christmas truce one of the most unusual events of the first world war when a ceasefire football match was played between opposing Allied and German troops. Crossing the Field uses contemporary art to reflect upon footballs power to transcend the bleakest scenes and the most difficult circumstances to bring people together.

The exhibition, which features photographs and artworks made around Europe, runs from 8 November 2014, to 10 January 2015, at Pitzhanger Manor Gallery in London.

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The first world war in stereoscope... photographs from the front line

Stereoscopic images were introduced to the public by Sir David Brewster at the Crystal Palace exhibition of 1850. By the 1890, production of the images was fully industrialised. Individual stereoscopic cards could be bought from local booksellers or stereo emporiums.

The incredible range of stereoscopic images used to tell the story of Tony Robinsons World War 1 were sourced from a variety of sources across several countries. The producers worked with a number of organisations and museums who supplied the imagery including the Imperial War Museum, the Markisches Museum in Berlin, the Cloth Hall Museum in Ypres, The University of California and Getty as well as private collectors such as World of Stereo View.

Tony Robinsons World War One is on Discovery Channel at 8pm on Sunday.

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Manfrotto introduces new lens filter lineup

DP Review News - Sat, 08/11/2014 - 16:00

Manfrotto has introduced new lens filters, with UV, Circular Polarizer and Protective versions available. Offered in up to three flavors - Essential, Advanced and Professional - each filter offers anti-reflective and water repellent coatings. The filters are only available online with prices ranging from $24.99-169.99. Read more

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Supersense offers 66/6 Limited Edition instant pinhole camera

DP Review News - Sat, 08/11/2014 - 15:00

Supersense, a Vienna-based retailer of high-end goods designed to appeal to the five senses, has targeted analog fans with its new 66/6, a limited edition pinhole camera compatible with Polaroid's Instant film. Read more

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Why stars love Polaroid’s retro chic: no risk of embarrassing uploads on the net

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Sat, 08/11/2014 - 14:19
Revival for photo format joins other analogue passions endorsed by new celebrity generation

The Polaroid camera was once a godsend for couples interested in a spot of erotic photography. No need for that embarrassing trip to the chemist to get the developed pictures. Now, in a different age but for similar reasons, Polaroids are making a comeback as stars look to protect their privacy in the digital era.

In the wake of the recent celebrity nude photo leak, which saw photos of more than 100 female celebrities, including Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst and Kate Upton, released on the internet, another victim, Big Bang star Kaley Cuoco, has declared: “Polaroids are the way to go. No one can get those.”

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Why stars love Polaroids retro chic: no risk of embarrassing uploads on the net

Revival for photo format joins other analogue passions endorsed by new celebrity generation

The Polaroid camera was once a godsend for couples interested in a spot of erotic photography. No need for that embarrassing trip to the chemist to get the developed pictures. Now, in a different age but for similar reasons, Polaroids are making a comeback as stars look to protect their privacy in the digital era.

In the wake of the recent celebrity nude photo leak, which saw photos of more than 100 female celebrities, including Jennifer Lawrence, Kirsten Dunst and Kate Upton, released on the internet, another victim, Big Bang star Kaley Cuoco, has declared: Polaroids are the way to go. No one can get those.

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Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: a tribute to the power of the image

A show in which John Malkovich recreates famous photographs of the past is funny but its real subject is the way images permeate public consciousness

Being everyone: John Malkovich re-creates iconic photos of Marilyn, Che, Einstein and more in pictures

Before John Malkovich was a Hollywood star, he made his name in Chicago as a member of the famed Steppenwolf theatre company. Since then, his career has been defined by his willingness to transform himself radically, in films including Of Mice and Men, Empire of the Sun and of course Being John Malkovich.

It is this talent for metamorphosis that makes Malkovich a perfect subject for Sandro Millers new exhibition, Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, which opened on Friday at Chicagos Catherine Edelman Gallery.

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The 20 photographs of the week

The anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan, the continuing crisis on the Turkish-Syrian border, the murmurations of starlings the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Best action cameras: the GoPro Hero4 and four other devices put to the test

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Sat, 08/11/2014 - 08:30

Mark Webb, who has five BMX world titles, straps on the latest sports video cameras and takes them for a tailwhip

“I’m a show-off. That’s what we do.” Mark Webb is not coy about the nature of modern BMX-riding; an intensely competitive sport that demands rigorous training, high risk and brazen showmanship. Though only 29, Webb has five world titles and a veteran’s understanding of the BMX world, testified by an unconventional skeleton that bears the evidence of two smashed knees, a broken back and a foot that “doesn’t really work anymore”.

Film-making and extreme sports have always gone hand in hand and handheld amateur videos filmed in skateparks have long been the primary way for skaters and BMXers to gain exposure. “Ten years ago, you’d have that one mate with a Handycam who’d film a day’s session and spend a week editing it,” says Webb says. “That’s changed now. Everything’s become instant.” Mobile internet, social media and, now, tiny, durable, hi-res cameras have allowed riders like Webb to document their careers day by day, hour by hour, and to build huge, devoted fanbases online. This is also, Webb says, a large part of what makes him a bankable product. “Social media makes you who you are these days, it’s the be-all and end-all. Riders have to be taking photos, filming clips and uploading them every day, that’s where the value is.” We conduct our trial at a sparkling new indoor skatepark in Bognor Regis, and throughout the morning young fans sheepishly accost Webb for signed helmets and, inevitably, photographs. Webb grins gamely and offers fist-bumps. “Having loads of Instagram followers is almost more valuable than having five X-Games medals,” he says.

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Family life: Armistice Day, Débris by the Faces and apple chutney

Readers favourite photographs, songs and recipes

This is my grandma, Joan Theresa Syrett (née Wagstaff), selling flags on Armistice Day 1918. She was born on 15 May 1915, the middle child of five. Her mother died suddenly when Joan was 15 and she had to help her father look after her younger brother and sister.

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Allen Jones, Duncan Campbell, Robert Heinecke: this weeks new exhibitions

From Allen Joness erotic art in London to Robert Heineckens neo-surrealism in Liverpool, Skye Sherwin and Robert Clark find out whats happening in art around the country

After more than a centurys hiatus, Lord Leightons lavish abode is once again hosting a stellar gathering of his artist friends. Work from the Pérez Simón collection of 19th-century art will echo Leightons Arabian architectural fantasy, which includes a blue-tiled peacock room. Lawrence Alma-Tademas painting The Roses Of Heliogabalus, last shown here 100 years ago, contains dark undertones, while Leightons own painterly vision of sexuality, on the other hand, is pure sugar: his angelic nymph Crenaia poses coyly, her rosy flesh emerging from diaphanous white linen. Other highlights include Pre-Raphaelite greats Millais, Rossetti and Burne-Jones.

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Monochrome Cairo and sepia Syria: early photographs of the Middle East  in pictures

In 1862, the Prince of Wales (later King Edward VII) was sent on an educational tour of the Middle East, accompanied by the British photographer Francis Bedford the first photographer to ever join a royal tour. A new exhibition at The Queens Gallery, Buckingham Palace, documents Bedfords work, showing dignitaries, landscapes and classical ruins from a time untouched by modernity

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Francis Bedfords astonishing photographs of the 1862 royal tour

When the Prince of Wales was sent away on a trip to the Middle East to prevent him behaving badly, Francis Bedford went with him the pictures he took captured famous sites unchanged for thousands of years

Six Egyptians possibly attendants of the Victorian photographer Francis Bedford and his companions are arranged in a receding zigzag across the rough, uneven floor, dwarfed by walls, pillars and doorjambs in an austere, finely detailed 1862 image of the Ptolemaic Temple of Horus. Bedford must have insisted on between 10 and 12 seconds of complete stillness from the human figures in this majestic work, fully consonant with the 19th-century vogue for the timeless, immovable east except for one deliberate anachronism. Between two of the pillars stands a white canvas hut. Here is Bedfords portable darkroom, scene of minute struggles with the collodion process for making glass negatives. Thus an art form barely 20 years old breaks the repose of Ozymandias.

The photograph is one of around 190 that Bedford took when he accompanied the 20-year-old Prince of Wales, Albert Edward (Bertie), on a four-month tour of the Middle East in 1862, and which entered the Royal Collection after his return. They are currently on display at the Queens Gallery in London, in a handsome exhibition that does not, however, fully explore all the possibilities of its subject.

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The British Museum shows off Germany's technical brilliance  and its hard-won soul

As the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall arrives, a British Museum exhibition is a reminder of the incredible richness of German arts and crafts and shows us how history can have a happy ending

This weekend is the 25th anniversary of the Berlin Walls end. It is therefore fitting that a chunk of the wall, one of the many real and fake souvenirs that have circulated since its joyous destruction, is the first thing you see as you enter the British Museums outstanding exhibiiton Germany: Memories of a Nation.

In Berlin itself, the course of the mostly vanished wall that once defaced a continent is to be marked by 8000 lights plotting its path across a city that has emerged as arguably Europes greatest since that magical democratic moment when crowds surged from east to west, as guards stood by helpless. They surge once more on screen in the British Museum show, in news footage of the walls last moments.

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Human behaviour: the forgotten gems of 2014's portrait photography in pictures

Portrait Salon was founded in 2011 by Carole Evans and James O Jenkins, to showcase the rejected but still brilliant images from the Taylor Wessing photography prize. Heres the best of this years selection

  • Portrait Salon is at the Four Corners gallery, London, and will tour the UK next year
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Thats me in the picture: Jan Rose Kasmir at an anti-Vietnam war rally at the Pentagon, in 1967

None of the guardsmen made eye contact. I think they were afraid they were going to be told to fire at us

I was 17 when this picture was taken, and by that point I was already dedicated to the anti-war movement. I felt that the war in Vietnam was a horrible expression of American imperialism and we had no business being there.

I went by myself to the march on the Pentagon, and when I arrived, everyone gathered around the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool. As we walked to the Pentagon I fell in with a crowd who were chanting Viva Che, Viva Che I didnt even know what a Che was! I had never heard of Che Guevara.

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