News

Olympus Stylus Tough TG-4 to offer Raw capture

DP Review News - Mon, 13/04/2015 - 06:00

Olympus has announced a new flagship rugged compact, the Stylus Tough TG-4. It offers modest improvements over its TG-3 predecessor, namely Raw shooting capability. It offers the same 16MP BSI CMOS sensor as the previous model, a 25-100mm equivalent f/2.0-4.9 zoom lens, Wi-Fi, and a built-in GPS. Read more

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Australia's tragic history of forced adoptions – in pictures

Thousands of non-consenting, unmarried mothers were forced to give their babies up for adoption in Australia over several decades. A new exhibition at the National Archives in Canberra, Without Consent, documents their plight. Director general David Fricker paid tribute to ‘the courage and generosity of those who volunteered to share their experiences and, in doing so, exposed this previously unknown aspect of Australia’s history’

Without Consent is at the National Archives of Australia, Canberra until 19 July

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How a visual cliche about mental health can slip through | Chris Elliott: Open door

The pressures of decision-making in a hurry sometimes get the better of our intention not to use ‘headclutcher’ pictures on mental health stories

A “headclutcher” is a type of stock picture often – too often, according to campaigning charities – used to illustrate stories about mental ill health. An example in the Guardian accompanied an article on 7 April with the headline “How not to talk to somebody with depression”. The picture, of a young man sitting with his head in his hands, was changed – following complaints below the line – to one of a young woman looking out of a window, which also drew criticism.

NYBrit commented: “It’s a stereotypically sad image. The point being made was that people who are depressed appear as happy as everybody else. It’s a mask we wear. Given that a large part of the problem is that people who don’t have depression often don’t understand it, a happy image would perhaps have been more appropriate.”

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Jet Set: The travel photography and photojournalism of Mark Edward Harris

DP Review News - Sun, 12/04/2015 - 13:00

With nearly thirty years of photography as well as almost ninety countries under his belt, travel, editorial and reportage photographer Mark Edward Harris has dedicated his eye to capturing life. His career in photography began as a still shooter for the Merv Griffin Show, but it was a four month trek through Asia when the show ended that first ignited his true love; travel photography. Read more about Harris' photography as well as his tips on traveling light in our Q+A. See gallery

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Improbable libraries: unusual places to bury your head in a book…

In an extract from his new book, Alex Johnson looks at the imaginative forms the modern library takes

Does your library arrive at your home on an elephant? Perhaps it floats down the river? Is it in your local telephone box, railway station – or even your back garden?

Librarians have a long history of overcoming geographic, economic and political challenges to bring the written word to an eager audience. They continue to live up to that reputation, despite the rapid and sweeping changes in how we read and share books in the 21st century.

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Lensbaby Velvet 56mm f/1.6 real-world sample gallery posted

DP Review News - Sat, 11/04/2015 - 20:19

The latest from Lensbaby, the Velvet 56mm f/1.6, is designed to bring soft, dream-like effects to portraiture. It also provides a minimum focus distance of 5 inches for macro work. It's by no means cheap for what it offers at $499.95, but for some photographers will offer the ability to capture soft focus effects in-camera rather than through processing. We took the Velvet 56 out for a spin. See gallery

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Family life: My grandfather serving in Flanders, Ocean Colour Scene and homemade chocolate aeroplanes

Readers’ favourite photographs, songs and recipes

In the summer of 1917, five young men from Ireland and north-west England arrive at Passchendaele, ready for “the big match at Wipers”. Soldiers of the Army Service Corps (ASC – “Ally Sloper’s Cavalry” – named after a newspaper cartoon of the time), they drove ambulances, evacuating the dead and injured from the front; or, in the words of my grandfather Michael Sieve (the spelling of the family name was later changed to Seeve), standing on the far right of the photograph, “putting the bits and bloody pieces back together again”.

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The 20 photographs of the week

The Walter Scott shooting, the aftermath of the Garissa attack in Kenya, the ongoing crisis in Syria, the 2015 Masters at Augusta – the best photography in news, culture and sport from around the world this week

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Christopher Morris in Ecuador as Mount Tungurahua erupts, 2014

‘I flipped between thinking, “This is so cool” and “Are we in danger?”’

In the junior year of my acting degree, I chose to study Spanish in Cumbayá, just outside Quito in Ecuador. I was living with a lovely 65-year-old woman, Aida.

I met a lot of other Americans who were there to study. One weekend we visited Baños. One of its biggest attractions is “the swing at the end of the world”, it sits on the edge of a cliff with incredible views. We were lucky with the weather – sunshine and clear skies – and rented quad bikes to ride up the mountain to the swing. On the way up, we passed friends coming back down. “Apparently the volcano is active today,” they said. On a clear day, the swing has an amazing view of Mount Tungurahua. Viewing it from more than 8,500ft (3,000m) above sea level, there’s usually cloud cover. To be clear enough to even see the volcano was lucky – to see it active was the best of luck.

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CP+ 2015: Nikon Interview - 'We learned from the D600 episode'

DP Review News - Fri, 10/04/2015 - 21:39

When we attended CP+ earlier this year in Yokohama, Japan we sat down with senior executives from several major camera and lens manufacturers. We were lucky enough to sit down with a number of Nikon engineers to ask them about their overall strategy with respect to FX vs DX, and DSLR vs mirrorless. We were also able to ask pointed technical questions regarding innovative technologies in Nikon cameras, and the answers were very enlightening. Click through to read the interview

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Nikon firmware update to allow improved communication with Atomos recording devices

DP Review News - Fri, 10/04/2015 - 19:09

Nikon has announced that it will release new firmware for three of its DSLRs, improving their ability to communicate with the Atomos Shogun and Ninja-2 external video recording devices. The cameras concerned are the Nikon D4S, the D810 and the D750 and the update is slated to arrive this summer. Read more

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Bronze zombies, Neil MacGregor and Prince Harry kills off the selfie – the week in art

The brilliant British Museum director is standing down, as terrible statues are ruining art and the prince puts the final nail in the selfie coffin. Not to mention Jesus Christ, the family man and Facebook’s new HQ – it’s your weekly art dispatch

One of the great pioneers of abstract art electrifies Tate Modern with swirling painted light.
Tate Modern, London SE1, from 15 April until 9 August.

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Photo highlights of the day

The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of the best photographs from around the world, including ladies’ day at Aintree, a water festival in Thailand and a duststorm in Turkey

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Painted Nudes show the king of street photography’s strange secret life

For two ‘lost decades’, colour-photography pioneer Saul Leiter pretended he was working on nothing – when actually he was busy painting over decades’ worth of black-and-white nude photos. Sean O’Hagan celebrates the private pursuits of the quiet man of American photography

Even in his 80s, when he was belatedly acknowledged as a pioneer of colour photography, Saul Leiter – who died aged 89 in November 2013 – steadfastly refused to be canonised by the art world. “In order to build a career and be successful,” he said, “one has to be ambitious. I much prefer to drink coffee, listen to music and paint when I feel like it.”

As an intriguing new book shows, Leiter felt like painting a lot of the time. Painted Nudes collects 70 of the several hundred works Leiter made between the 70s and 1990 by applying gouache, watercolours and casein to his black-and-white nude photographic portraits of women friends and models.

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Psychology of smiling: can you tell a fake smile from a genuine one?

The Guardian on Photography Technology - Fri, 10/04/2015 - 07:30

Psychologist Richard Wiseman has devised a photographic test to check people’s empathy. Do you pass the test?

A smile is the universal welcome, the writer Max Eastman once remarked. But how sure can we be that a person’s smile is genuine? The answer is the empathy test, created by psychologist Richard Wiseman, which probes our ability to appreciate the feelings of others – from their appearance.

A photographer asks a subject to imagine meeting an individual they don’t like and to put on a fake smile. Later the subject sits with a real friend and as they converse, the photographer records their genuine smile. Thus two versions of their smile are recorded.

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Spot the impostor: which of these are actually photographs?

The photorealist artists of the 60s and 70s explored the blurred lines of a hyperreal America. A rootin’ tootin’ new show puts people to the test with these all-American images of slick streetscapes, horse rustlers, Airstream caravans and Wet’n’Wild waterpark

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Fotodiox pays 'homage' to Hasselblad Stellar with wooden grip for Sony RX100 series

DP Review News - Thu, 09/04/2015 - 22:37

Accessories brand Fotodiox has introduced a cherry wood hand grip for the Sony Cyber-shot RX100 III that it says is 'inspired' by the Hasselblad Stellar special edition cameras first launched in 2013. At $59.95 it makes a somewhat more affordable solution, even when you add the price of the camera, than the $1650 Hasselblad wanted for last year's Stellar II. Read more

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Linkedin announces lynda.com acquisition

DP Review News - Thu, 09/04/2015 - 21:00

Linkedin has announced plans to acquire lynda.com, home to extensive online photography classes. The deal is expected to close in the second quarter of 2015, bringing lynda.com's library of educational content to Linkedin's professional networking site, all for approximately $1.5 billion. Read more 

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